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Thread: Winter Wheels

  1. #31

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    Re: Winter Wheels

    @atgonzales: I`m expecting -- 1/ they`ll be really soft 2/ on the dry they`ll turn most control input into an "rrrrrrip" type sound instead of a change in speed or direction 3/ whether they`ll be worth it will depend on how severe a winter mother nature throws at me 4/ excellent fuel economy 5/ lots of traction control lights.

    I have, however, determined through personal experience with various tires (including older Hakka RSi) and reading online that really sensitive traction control systems trigger just from the tread squirm and you aren`t actually spinning up the tires. This is consistent with my past observations, anyways. Think of taking a simple plastic comb and running a finger tip across it, making a "rrrrip" sound. That`s (good) winter tires in the dry.

  2. #32

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    Re: Winter Wheels

    Managed to get the C5 on the wheels today and put them back in storage for now.

    Used less C5 than I expected - hope I used enough. Couldn`t see where I had applied to judge whether there was enough. It was completely invisible on the surface (metallic paint + clearcoat) though it resulted in a "squeaky feel" while I was applying.

    I bought a 30mL bottle hoping to do both my winter and summer wheels. I ended up using 10mL at most, and I did full barrels and all. They`re 18x8.5J wheels.

  3. #33

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    Re: Winter Wheels

    Quote Originally Posted by Nizmo View Post
    Above and beyond there, lol. We just run steelies with no hubcaps. It does look a little goofy going from 18" low pro to base model 16" steels. Not even going to mention the nagging TPMS light with the absence of the sensors.

    Are TPMS the biggest rip off of the motoring public, or what? a Doz morons deflated their explorer tires and then failed the tires and rolled the truck. so, now the rest of us are stuck with these friggin things that cost 75$ ea, complicate having winter wheels as you say, and don`t last forever. When they fail, you get code on the dash and you wont get inspected with the code showing.

    Write your representatives.

  4. #34

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    Re: Winter Wheels

    arthur- Welcome to Autopia!

    I`d never drive any vehicle without a start-of-day preflight inspection, and yeah...like you, I have no use for TPMS (which only one of our vehicles has). But I gotta say that my not-into-vehicles friends actually find TPMS useful.

    Note that the Ford Explorer thing was significantly exacerbated by Ford`s too-low recommended inflation pressures. Not the only time they`ve done that either...nonsense (well, it`s nonsense to *me*) like even tire wear and an artificially softened ride apparently helps sell vehicles. At least it helps sales to people who don`t *really* want what certain vehicles inherently are! E.g., their recommended pressures for Crown Vics is *WAY* below what provides optimum handling, and just a few psi under that recommended pressure is enough to cause rim-to-pavement contact during emergency maneuvers. But people like long tire life and even tire wear, and a softer ride than a body-on-frame vehicle is naturally gonna provide.

  5. #35

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    Re: Winter Wheels

    Quote Originally Posted by Surly View Post
    Managed to get the C5 on the wheels today and put them back in storage for now.
    The Hakkas are now on.
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  6. #36

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    Re: Winter Wheels

    Quote Originally Posted by Surly View Post
    The Hakkas are now on.
    Surly:
    Doesn`t your Canadian providence of Ontario mandate by provincial law that ALL vehicles driven in winter have snow-and-ice rated/designated tires on them??
    I am just wondering how much of an effect that has on the reduction of the number of winter-related accidents in your providence.
    I only ask because I think I saw a statistic that the Ontario government analyzed winter accident reports before this law and found that 90% of those accidents involved vehicles WITHOUT snow-and-ice designated tires on them (IE, they were running summer-only or an all-season tire compound/tread designation), which was the impetus to pass this winter tire requirement legislation.

    Would that type of legislation pass as a law in my northern USA state of Wisconsin? While a great idea, the cost factor to force winter drivers to have snow-and-ice designated tires would probably kill such a law. We have a mandatory car insurance law in Wisconsin and a small minority of drivers drive without insurance because they cannot afford it, for any number of reasons. How could they afford a set of winter tires?

    Long ago in the late `60`s-early `70`s, snow tires could be studded to improve traction on ice and snow-packed roads in Wisconsin. They did, indeed, do just that. BUT, people ran them into late May and on bare roads those hardened-steel studs chewed up the roads so bad, they cause grooves to be formed in concrete highways and eventually Wisconsin outlawed the use of studded tires because of the road degradation they caused. I ended up pulling the studs out of my fathers snow tires with a plyers so they could be used as legal "conventional" snow tires on his car. Studs made such a whining sound on a bare road, much like your fore-mentioned finger nail raking across the teeth of a plastic comb, and it was easy to tell who still had studded tires on a vehicle! I tell this bit of winter tire history because I am old enough to remember it and it is a parallel (but definitely not the same) story to current winter tires and driving.
    GB detailer

  7. #37

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    Re: Winter Wheels

    Quote Originally Posted by Lonnie View Post
    Surly:
    Doesn`t your Canadian providence of Ontario mandate by provincial law that ALL vehicles driven in winter have snow-and-ice rated/designated tires on them??
    No it doesn`t, but I wish it did. It`s not even to the point where all insurance providers give incentive discounts (which I wish they did).


    I am just wondering how much of an effect that has on the reduction of the number of winter-related accidents in your providence.
    This would be nice. As it is I`ve made it a tradition for more than a decade that for the first 2-3 snows I don`t go ANYWHERE and just hide with my car garaged. When I`ve had to go out, even a light snow combined with no anti-icing, driver inexperience and the number texting, latte-sipping, inattentive drivers with bald summer tires sliding all over trying to get their kids to sports on time makes it extremely treacherous.

    Once the majority get the proper tires on, and there`s some salt etc... residue down, then things get back to "normal".


    I only ask because I think I saw a statistic that the Ontario government analyzed winter accident reports before this law and found that 90% of those accidents involved vehicles WITHOUT snow-and-ice designated tires on them (IE, they were running summer-only or an all-season tire compound/tread designation), which was the impetus to pass this winter tire requirement legislation.
    Except me having winter tires doesn`t stop the guy behind me from plowing into me, or someone blowing through a red light into the side of me because they can`t stop.


    Long ago in the late `60`s-early `70`s, snow tires could be studded to improve traction on ice and snow-packed roads in Wisconsin. They did, indeed, do just that. BUT, people ran them into late May and on bare roads those hardened-steel studs chewed up the roads so bad, they cause grooves to be formed in concrete highways and eventually Wisconsin outlawed the use of studded tires because of the road degradation they caused.
    Here in Ontario, the rules are something like: you can run studded snows (with time limits Nov-May) on public roads if you have a residence in Parry Sound or north. I`m not sure if it needs to be your primary residence, or if it could be a vacation home. I had a tire shop that would put them on for me, but I passed. I was thinking of studded Hakka 7s at one point in the past.

    much like your fore-mentioned finger nail raking across the teeth of a plastic comb, and it was easy to tell who still had studded tires on a vehicle!
    I was referring to my Hakka RSis turning most control inputs into a rrrrrip velcro noise of the sipes and tread squirming instead of actually responding. (Unless it was, like, -15C or so). So far the Hakka R2s are superior in that regard, not that I`ve driven very far.
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  8. #38

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    Re: Winter Wheels

    Quote Originally Posted by MattPersman View Post
    Ws80s are nice. They say at 50% there is 10% multicell compound left. And I get it cause at 50% tread on a winter tire you are less than 6/32. Cause they start at 11/32. 6/32 starts to get a little less than optimal in severe weather. You want the most depth you can get obviously.

    I had a couple sets of x ice michelins. They weren`t bad really either not as good as the ws80 though

    Had the Dunlop 3D on a vw thought these were a good tire for a "performance" winter

    Had Yokohama w drive on a wrx and they were pretty much all seasons.

    Ws60s I had on a Camaro years ago were my first winter tires and they were fantastic.

    R2s is what I wanted before the ws80 for last winter but I got a very good price on the ws80 so I couldn`t pass and being blizzaks I knew they would be good

    Budget sometimes trumps overall pick if it`s close.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    On our 2017 Accord sport I️ just got my wheels and tires for the winter. Continental WinterContact SI on some basic wheels (MB discount tire specials)



    This is one wheel I had just applied Dlux to.

    Winter wheel set over the course of a few years seems to be a wise purchase.

    One 19 tire on this accord is like 260 for the tire. Thin 19s like to bend wheels too when the streets are terrible in the winter so like 600 for a wheel and tire if I️ tear one factory one up. No thanks. Plus the stopping and turning power alone with winters




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  9. #39

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    Re: Winter Wheels

    Quote Originally Posted by MattPersman View Post
    ..Winter wheel set over the course of a few years seems to be a wise purchase.
    I only tried swapping tires onto the regular rims a few times before I realized that the winter wheels made more sense for me. If nothing else, redoing wheels after mounting/balancing is a huge undertaking compared to just refreshing their LSP.

    .. Thin 19s like to bend wheels too when the streets are terrible in the winter..
    We hardly ever drive low-profile setups (let alone in the winter) any more, only have 35-series (summer) tires on the S8 these days..our roads are just too awful. "Just avoid those potholes" sounds good, but it`s simply not possible when the whole road is like that and when the lane-wide pavement breaks alone are sufficient to bend a rim. I simply don`t know how folks manage...
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  10. #40
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    Re: Winter Wheels

    I`m tempting fate this year and not running winter tires. The back set of Blizzaks are too crusty and I don`t feel like buying new ones. I live just west of DC so there isn`t much snow, and TBH, you really are better off not driving around here when the roads are bad. We have a lot of cultural diverisity here and a complete lack of understanding by some folks as to what happens to roads. Mix in the goons that think they are invincable in their brand new SUV, and its just a better idea to wait 2-3 days before venturing out after a big snow fall. Thankfully my job is flexible as far as work location.

    As to the TPMS hate, I concur on some fronts, but I really do like the VW implementation on the lower end cars, it uses the ABS sensors to calculate wheels speed vs actual air pressure, it works quite well, however it doesn`t tell you which tire is low, for that you have to rely on your $5 Milton.

  11. #41

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    Re: Winter Wheels

    Yeah Tpms can be a bummer our Odyssey I️ just change over the tires cause it uses sensors. Not a big deal since I️ work at a shop with a changer and balancer.

    The accord we got apparently uses the abs style so no sensors were needed.

    Years past on previous vehicles I️ just ran with the light on all winter.

    I️ figure if I️ can prevent a big winter by buying a set of winters then I’ll do it.

    Kinda like the year you buy that new snow blower and you get a couple 1-2 inch snows. Lol


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  12. #42
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    Re: Winter Wheels

    Don`t forget a genrator to that list!

    It`s nice that you can mount your own tires. I dread getting it done, even though I have a shop that is competant, I still worry about getting scratches.

  13. #43

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    Re: Winter Wheels

    Quote Originally Posted by Dan View Post
    I`m tempting fate this year and not running winter tires. The back set of Blizzaks are too crusty and I don`t feel like buying new ones. I live just west of DC so there isn`t much snow, and TBH, you really are better off not driving around here when the roads are bad. We have a lot of cultural diverisity here and a complete lack of understanding by some folks as to what happens to roads. Mix in the goons that think they are invincable in their brand new SUV, and its just a better idea to wait 2-3 days before venturing out after a big snow fall. Thankfully my job is flexible as far as work location.
    Ain`t that the truth!!! Winter weather driving is a real skill that takes experience to master and, as you state, understand vehicle dynamics and handling. Unfortunately, this is done on-the-fly on the real world roads and streets and not in some empty parking lot. I am not advocating that "nubies" try hand-brake turns in the snow, but at least try turning and braking with their vehicle to "get the feel of it" before venturing out onto the snow-covered road if they`ve never driven in these conditions. One thing I will say is that anti-lock brakes are both a blessing and a curse. Blessing because even a neophyte can stop a vehicle without losing control in slippery conditions. Curse because the same neophyte THINKS they can stop in the same distance as on a dry road or they let off the brake pedal, thinking something is wrong with a pulsing pedal underfoot, rather than just stomping their foot on the pedal. In deep snow, you can actually stop shorter if you feather the pedal just before lock-up rather than locking up the pedal and letting the anti-lock do its thing, but very few drivers are aware of that. On ice, anti-locks win hands-down and for 99.9% of the drivers its a godsend. Before anti-locks you has to pump-and-release in rapid succession on a brake pedal and it was a real skill to master and determine how far it would take to stop under what conditions. I still try this with anti-locks on streets or roads, depending on the current winter weather conditions just to see how much distance it requires for that particular weather. Sometimes it`s a real shock when what you THINK will be the stopping distance and find out what it really is by this method. It at least gives you a better feel on how fast you can drive and what distance you can allow to follow behind another vehicle. I am also the "jerk driver" who will feign a quick stop if I have determined another driver is too close behind me just so they "understand" how really slippery winter road conditions are. I`d rather have that driver "flip me off" than run into me
    GB detailer

  14. #44

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    Re: Winter Wheels

    Eh, too many people think of it as a "right to drive"...in their (incorrect) opinions they don`t need real driver`s training, they don`t need anything they can`t afford, but hey they DO need to drive and the rest of us are supposed to just...uhm...watch out. Meanwhile viable public transportation runs around at half-capacity and nobody walks anywhere.

    Lonnie- Be careful with those brakechecks, if they hit you it could drag on longer than you`d expect (not always just an "assured clear distance" thing) and a whole lotta people will do more than just flip you off; we just had another shooting in our area over something trivial like that (and we live in an *very* low-crime/violence area).

    If you just CAN`T RESIST, try just turning on your headlights, many [dummies] mistake them for brakelights even in these days of HCMBLs (think that`s the abbreviation). But be ready for a violent response...even if it`s only taken out on your vehicle, and remember that you can`t legally [injure] somebody for messing with your vehicle.

    Oh gee, don`t I sound like a [paranoid jerk] again... ...but it`s based on first-hand experience with people who don`t, uhm...follow the rules.

  15. #45

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    Re: Winter Wheels

    Quote Originally Posted by Lonnie View Post
    I still try this with anti-locks on streets or roads, depending on the current winter weather conditions just to see how much distance it requires for that particular weather. Sometimes it`s a real shock when what you THINK will be the stopping distance and find out what it really is by this method. It at least gives you a better feel on how fast you can drive and what distance you can allow to follow behind another vehicle.
    Whenever there`s anything of substance on the road, or if I move from one "traction area" into another, like different road treatment from area to area, I`m always checking where the limit is, usually with either pedal. It`s also how I figure out how a particular model of winter tire handles various conditions.

 

 
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