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  1. #1

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    The thin carpet upholstery in the roof of my 1996 Nissan Sentra is slowly falling off and I would like to re-attach it securely. I thought of double-sided tape, but under the carpet is a layer of dusty carpet remains that precludes the tape from sticking. If I try to clean this dust, I fear the carpet will un-stick even more. Any suggestions as to how I might refasten the carpet? Thanks in advance.

  2. #2

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    OK, now hang on, for it is not as simple as you may consider.

    One, the "dust" is the "foam" backing under the fabric, and that is "toast", no fixing, nothing will replace the foam that has broken down due to one or two of normal things.

    First, somewhere in the life of the vehicle, someone attempted to clean it with a "fabric cleaner" that contained a butyl component which attacks foam and breaks it down over time.

    Second, and the more reasonable, in your case, is a cause of age and heat.

    The foam is glued to the fabric and then applied to the interior roof, this is the method used on vehicle made after aprox the early to mid 80`s. It is glued to the sheet metal, which transfers the heat from the roof to the headliner.

    The heat and "age" (heavy smoker cars are worse for the concern) breaks down the foam and therefore there is nothing for the glue to hold on to.

    Here is how to think of this, "can you make a band-aid stick to a dirty finger or such?"

    Nope, it is not "clean" it has particles which do allow the adhesive to "stick".

    Forget the double stick tape being your answer to the concern.

    You have limited choices, and seriously, only one is going to last.

    Have a quality automotive oriented interior and such shop replace the headliner.

    OR- pull the entire head liner down, clean the heck out of it (get all the old broken down foam off the cloth and the metal) to re-attach, apply a good, automotive adhesive that is formulated for such.

    It is basically a version of "contact" cement.

    Ever work with that stuff?

    You must apply the product to "both of the "clean" surfaces and then you can put it in place and do it at just the right time of the cure of the adhesive.

    It won`t look as good as new, but it will stay up there as long as the car will get down the road.

    Think it through and make the best decision for you.

    Grumpy

  3. #3
    Excellence Auto Gallery
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    Use thumb tacks.
    Abbotsford Auto Detailing in Abbotsford, BC, Canada

  4. #4
    Excellence Auto Gallery
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    So Ron, what is the best way to clean a dirty headliner?
    Abbotsford Auto Detailing in Abbotsford, BC, Canada

  5. #5

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    Without it "dropping down" later?

    Never use a all purpose or other water based cleaners which contain a "butyl" component.



    That particular surfactant loves to eat away glue, attack the foam, etc.



    It is not always possible to get headliners "completely clean" without damaging the glue, fabric or foam liner, so keep that in mind.



    Use a "huck" or "surgical" towel, fold it into a "quarter size", IE fold in half, then fold in half again to create a "pad".



    Spray a non-butyl cleaner onto the "pad", never spraying any water based or other cleaners directly onto the headliner.



    Do small areas, placing the "pad" flat to the cloth and agitate "gently", checking the "pad" for the soil coming off and transfering to the pad. When the pad shows the dirt transfered, flip the towel to a clean surface area and continue.



    On a smokers car, you may go through 4 or 5 towels, as this removes the nicotine residue, which is what is a normal concern.



    If there is "grease", spot, you may use the same pad technique, but using a quick flash solvent, unfortunately with current VOC regulations it is no longer possible to get perclore any more unless you are a dry cleaner and they are tightly regulated on it`s usage.



    I use lighter fluid (naptha), applying it to "pad" and follow the same method as with a water based, always checking the pad, and moving to a clean part of it.



    NEVER SOAK A HEADLINER WITH ANY CHEMICAL CLEANER OR WATER!



    There is a great, special brush that aids in this but they are around $25 or more each, called a "verlour spotting brush", and it has small, stiff, tight bristles that will agitate as well, just be careful and don`t apply pressure, just gently agitate the areas with the brush after using the clean pad technique. This may release more nicotine and soil, so always go back over and check the worked area.



    Follow up by wiping with a clean, dry huck towel, once again folded to a pad.



    Does it work to completely clean ALL headliners, no, as there are variables, like some one got the material overly wet when attempting to clean it before and has "set" the soil, etc and/or created water spotting of the fabric.



    Or the headliner is so old that the foam is already deteroiating and good luck.



    These are the basics, take your time, practice and it should take care of the situation in over 90% of issue.



    Grumpy

  6. #6
    Excellence Auto Gallery
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    So a light steam/vapor clean with the large triangle attachment wrapped in a towel is a no-no?
    Abbotsford Auto Detailing in Abbotsford, BC, Canada

  7. #7

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    That will work, if one doesn`t get the fabric too wet and the temperature of the fabric is not too high when you use one.

    Delta Sonic uses the steamer type of unit at all their 25+ shops and have had great success.

    They do wet the first towel of the treatment with the Omni solution first, find that it does a better job, then they put on a clean towel and just use the steam, followed by a dry huck towel.

    Often, they will then lightly brush the fabric surface with that velour brush to fluff the fibers.

    Grumpy

  8. #8
    xtremekustomz's Avatar
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    I would just redo the headliner. Take it down, pull the old material off and remove all the foam. You may have to end up using some sandpaper and or a stiff bristle brush. You can even get a brush from dollar store. Here is a website that sells a headliner kit. If you do this I like to spray the headliner with the glue, then spray the actual headliner material. Let that dry then respray both pieces and let it tach for a minute and apply the material. Cut the holes out as needed and you are done!



    Headliner Kits

 

 

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