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Thread: Glass Cleaning

  1. #1

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    So I`m almost ready to detail my car again, but I need something good to clean off the windows with! There`s a ton of rain marks and other residue all over them, and I`m not sure which path I should take.



    Remember that my glass is almost 15 years old and the previous owner never did a proper detailing job on it (not that I can see, when I got it there were leaves in the engine bay...)



    My friend swears by this stuff called Invisible Glass, and his windows looked great to me. However, I sprayed it on my windows and it didn`t seem to do much.



    On the other hand, I`ve heard that Invisible Glass in conjunction with steel wool can actually work great...now the question is, should I use the IG, or should I get another window cleaner, or what should I do? Should I use steel wool or stick with a MF?



    Thanks, I`d really just like people to share the best processes they`ve used for glass cleaning, and to state their experience with IG, if any.




  2. #2

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    As a smoker and someone who drives a lot of freeway miles, keeping my windows clean is the biggest challenge with my vehicle.



    I have had good luck using my PC with AIO on the outside of the front windsheild and then using Stoners IG to finish the outside and the insides.

  3. #3

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    We have some AIO, yes...interesting, I never thought of using the PC on the glass though.



    When you put the IG on the outside or insides, do you just wipe it with a MF?

  4. #4
    Eliot Ness's Avatar
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    IÃâ‚â„m one of those who really like IG. I usually use two MFÃâ‚â„sÃâ‚Â.. the first one to initially wipe off the IG and the second one to do a final buff. If your glass has been neglected it may require something a little stronger. Some have used 0000 steel wool with success, but others have experienced very fine micro-marring from using it. The problem is you wonÃâ‚â„t notice the marring right off, but in certain lighting conditions it may be very noticeable. It probably has a lot to do with the hardness of the glass so you may want to test a very small area first.



    If your spots are deep enough to feel it will be difficult to remove them. Since you have a PC you may try some VM (Vanille Moose) or AIO with a polish pad and see how they come out. Distilled White Vinegar also works well on water spots so that may be something to try first. Hopefully others will chime in with suggestions on neglected glass.
    John

  5. #5

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    try claying it first

  6. #6

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    i know someone who has clearcoat over spray on their windows is there any way to take this off?





    ive used stoners IG and it seems to work wonders with newspaper



    for the insides i just use a damp MF and a dry MF to follow up

  7. #7

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    I use the BMW approved glass cleaner as I have yet to find one that is any better. The best ting about it is that if you don`t quite get it the first time, it won`t dry hazy.



    For stubborn marks clay your windows first using the glass cleaner as a lubricant, then wipe with a clean MF or just some paper towel. I don`t like to put anything other than glass cleaner on my windshield because I hate it when my wipers smear!



    Ben

  8. #8

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    I would start by cleaning with vinegar and then evaluate the glass. Depending on what is on the glass, lighter fluid might also be an option.

  9. #9

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    Use a glass polish. There are a few differnt ones out there and you can either use them by hand or by machine.



    After that use a quality glass cleaner like IG or 20/20. I used to make a custom concoction of IPA, Vinegar, and Water. I also used to use Ammonia for subburn spots.

  10. #10
    Hooked For Life Bill D's Avatar
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    Originally posted by JungleMan



    My friend swears by this stuff called Invisible Glass, and his windows looked great to me. However, I sprayed it on my windows and it didn`t seem to do much.



    Wow, another member of the very small minority,including me, who had the same experience.



    Yeah, I`d try what the others suggest. I`m going to be on the look out for more obscure brands of alcohol based cleaners with the assumption that with some luck,I may stumble across the one formulated to my liking.

    Originally posted by DETAILKING

    After that use a quality glass cleaner like IG or 20/20. I used to make a custom concoction of IPA, Vinegar, and Water. I also used to use Ammonia for subburn spots.


    At time I`ve done something similar, using both the IPA mix and a vinegar based glass cleaner. Seemed ok.
    Treat it like it`s the only one in the world.

  11. #11

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    Thanks for all the advice guys. Now I`m definitely confused, but at least we`re going in the right direction.



    Take a look at my windows to see exactly what I am talking about. I`m pretty sure these are water marks:

    Window 1

    Window 2



    They`re not bad enough for me to physically feel them, but I just tried the distilled white vinegar + MF suggestion and it did nothing. I`m almost positive I`m going to need to use either my PC or steel wool...



    Now, about PC vs Steel Wool...which should I be using? I imagine steel wool would be more abrasive, but has anyone else heard of the marring that Eliot Ness mentioned?



    Thanks...hopefully the above pics will give you all a better idea of what the problem is and how to fix it.

  12. #12
    The Old Grey Whistle Test togwt's Avatar
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    Removing water spots:

    Alkaline watermarks (water spots) are calcium and magnesium salts that deposit on the surface after the water has evaporated; the minute crystals bond to the surface and are not re-dissolvable in water. These fall into one of two categories a) surface or b) below surface (etched) water spots. (See also Windscreen Protective Barrier)



    a) Removing water spots from glass- rainwater sometimes contains alkaline minerals that alight on the paint film surface and as the water evaporates leave white `water spots` on glass surfaces.



    Mineral deposits can be caused by water from a light summer shower, or a lawn sprinkler system that that dries on the glass surface leaving a calcium / sodium deposit.

    These can usually be removed by using detailer`s clay to remove any hardened surface deposits, and then using a solvent type cleaner (Klasse All-In-One) for stubborn spots polish them using method (b)



    Methodology:

    Ãâ‚ÂUse detailing clay to remove any `hard` surface granules

    Ãâ‚ÂTo dissolve the alkaline-based, surface/etched mineral water deposits try one or more of the following;

    a) 2:1 solution of distilled water/distilled white vinegar (Acetic acid)

    b) Distilled water / Isopropyl Alcohol (adjust ratio as required)

    c) Equal parts distilled water / distilled white vinegar / Isopropyl alcohol.

    Ãâ‚ÂUse a clean spray bottle and 100% cotton Microfiber cloth to apply the solution to the glass surface

    Ãâ‚ÂWipe off any residue from glass and dry with a damp waffle weave towel

    Ãâ‚ÂIf any `water spots` remain apply distilled white vinegar or Isopropyl alcohol un-diluted to 100% cotton Microfiber towel, using a medium/heavy pressure on glass surface.

    Ãâ‚ÂIf this does not remove the `water spots` use Autoglym Car Glass PolishTM and #0000 or #000 steel wool, use straight-line motions only (circular motions cause swirl marks)



    b)Removing etched (below surface) water spots from glass- are caused by acid rain or industrial fallout causing a chemical reaction, if left for any length of time they will etch the paint film surface leaving a concave circular mark.



    These can usually be removed using detailer`s clay to remove any hardened surface deposits and then using Autoglym Car Glass PolishTM with #0000 synthetic steel wool or Iz Einzette Glas Polish, a random orbital buffer (speed # 4) and a cutting foam pad (LC orange or yellow) to level the surface.



    Notes:

    1.Do not use abrasive cleaner; glass polish or any grade synthetic steel wool on after market-tinted glass or you will probably scratch the surface.

    2.For deeply etched water spots` in the glass surface, do not attempt to polish them out, consult an automotive glass vendor as glass used on later model cars is soft and thin (this may vary by manufacturer) due to weight / cost savings by vehicle manufactures and polishing could cause glass to crack.

    3.Be cautious with polishes that contain abrasives like aluminium or cerium oxide as they have the potential to damage glass beyond repair.

    4.Some windshields and mirrors have a tinted plastic coating or a blue tint that will scratch or be damaged, only polish or use synthetic wool on uncoated glass.

    JonM
    What gets overlooked too often is that one must be a student before becoming a teacher.

  13. #13
    Eliot Ness's Avatar
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    Originally posted by JungleMan

    ........Now, about PC vs Steel Wool...which should I be using? I imagine steel wool would be more abrasive, but has anyone else heard of the marring that Eliot Ness mentioned?.....
    Your links don`t seem to be working, but here is a thread on 0000 steel wool and glass you may find helpful:



    http://autopia.org/forums/showthread...ght=steel+wool
    John

  14. #14

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    Thanks for the link Eliot I think I`ll avoid using the steel wool.



    Seems to be what people are saying is some type of polish or compound with a PC (or by hand) works best.



    I have fixed my links, apparently my web server is down so I have to use another one.....

  15. #15
    Eliot Ness's Avatar
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    Here is another link on glass:



    http://autopia.org/forums/showthread...hlight=vinegar



    Hope this isn`t throwing too much info at you, but it may give you more ideas. I`d also try clay as someone else suggested. In the above link is a post by fogertyt about using clay. You may also want to make another try with vinegar, but let it sit on the glass and soak a while (cover it with a paper towel soaked in it). Good luck!
    John

 

 

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