Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 21
  1. #1
    Administrator
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Stuart, Florida
    Posts
    1,515
    Post Thanks / Like
    From the new Meguiar`s FAQ



    Under,



    Working with a machine versus working with your hands





    2. What`s the difference between?



    *Dual-Action polisher

    *Orbital buffer

    *Rotary buffer



    Dual-Action polishers and Orbital buffers



    The motors and drive units on these two types of polisher`s oscillate in an eccentric circular motion. This type of motion is much safer to the paint because it`s virtually impossible to apply too much concentrated pressure in one place at one time. Chances are good that when too much pressure is applied, the oscillating action will come to a stop thereby protecting the finish.



    Because these types of machines oscillate instead of rotate, they will not instill the dreaded buffer swirls or holograms into your finish as long as you use the appropriate chemicals, buffing pads and bonnets. This safety feature makes these machines highly popular with enthusiasts who would like to use a machine but at the same time, are afraid of burning or inflicting swirls into their car`s finish.



    Both the G-100 and Orbital buffers offer a number of benefits:



    Uncomplicated – Remove from box, attach buffing pad or bonnet, pug in, turn on, start buffing

    Versatile – Can be used for cleaning, polishing, and applying waxes.

    Takes most of the labor out of the process, the machine does the work, all you do is hold it.

    Faster, more thorough - you can cover more area and do a better job with a machine.

    Creates a more uniform, higher gloss finish than your hands.

    Pushes polishing oils and protective waxes into the pores and microscopic surface imperfections far better than your hands can ever accomplish.

    In recent years, the Porter Cable Dual-Action polisher (G-100) has become the machine of choice over the older style Orbital buffers for a number of different reasons:





    Smaller size and lighter weight makes them easier for anyone to use.

    Very easy to control, requires no previous experience or skill to use correctly.

    Smaller size enables you to work on small panels and tight areas easier with better control.

    More options for buffing pads and bonnets.

    Velcro interface makes changing between pads fast and easy.

    Rotary buffers





    Rotary Buffers



    Rotary buffers are drastically different in the way they work compared to Dual-action polishers and Orbital buffers.



    The drive unit used in a rotary buffer is referred to as a direct drive. What this means is the auger, (the threaded part to which the backing plate attaches), is driven directly off the electric motor. This results in a powerful rotating motion. This rotating motion is typically clockwise as you look at the rotary buffer from behind, as though you were using it on a panel.



    Because the rotary buffer is a direct drive machine, it can do a lot of work very quickly. By work, we mean, the rotary buffer will remove paint.



    Meguiar`s understands the average person doesn`t want to remove precious paint from their car`s finish. However, sometimes removing paint is necessary in order to create a high gloss, defect-free finish. Example: If you have a scratch in your car`s finish, say someone keyed your car, or a cat jumped up on the hood and left behind claw scratches. From a horizontal point of view, these scratches would look like this,







    In order to remove these scratches, you will need to remove enough paint surrounding the scratches in order to make the surface level. As you can see in this example, removing the scratches will require removing quite a bit of paint material, and in the case of the deep key scratch (where the arrow is pointing), you will not be able to completely remove it without exposing the base, or color coat of paint. This is a situation where you are better off improving the scratch, not completely removing the scratch.



    Second Example: Many cars, after being painted, are wet-sanded in order to remove orange peel or to bring the surface to a show car quality finish. After the finish has been sanded, the way you remove the sanding marks is to buff the finish with a cutting compound and a rotary buffer. The cutting compound abrades the paint, removing, or leveling the finish until it’s completely flat.



    After the surface is buffed flat, it will then be polished with a cleaner/polish like Meguiar’s M-83 Dual Action Cleaner/Polish with the rotary buffer to restore a swirl-free, high gloss finish. Rotary buffers are necessary to do both of these procedures because both of these procedures require that some portion of the paint is removed.



    Dual-action polishers and Orbital buffers do not have an aggressive enough action to remove small particles of paint in an effort to remove most defects, including sanding marks. This is the same reason Dual-action polishers and Orbital buffers are safe†they don’t have an aggressive action, thus they are safe. However, because they are safe (do not have an aggressive action), they are not aggressive enough to remove all but the finest of scratches.



    Do not purchase a dual action polisher or orbital buffer hoping to use these to remove major or even minor cratches, as they are just not aggressive enough. They can often be used to remove fine or shallow scratches and swirls, but they will not remove any scratch that is deep enough to place your fingernail into.



    Remember, using a rotary buffer successfully requires both skill and experience. If you use a rotary buffer and are not skilled in its use, you can easily apply too much pressure to the paint and burn right through it, requiring a new paint job. This same result can happen if you use a buffing pad attached to an electric drill.



    (G-100 is the part number for the Porter Cable in the Meguiar`s line, same tool, different warranty)



    Hope this helps...



    Mike

  2. #2

    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Montreal,QC
    Posts
    10
    Post Thanks / Like
    This is great! Thanks!

  3. #3
    My L5-S1 is killing me! wifehatescar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    South Lyon, MI
    Posts
    1,307
    Post Thanks / Like
    I got a question, regarding pressure applied on the PC.



    If you don`t use much pressure, the pad will spin and move (moving product faster I assume).

    If you use moderate pressure (in an attempt to be more aggressive but I assume the product is moved slower), the pad stops spinning but continues to move.



    Is one of these 2 techniques more aggressive, cut faster, etc??? Is one better than the other? How are they different?



    Thanks.
    We can rebuild him. We have the capability to make the world’s first bionic man. Better than he was before. Better Stronger Faster

  4. #4
    Administrator
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Stuart, Florida
    Posts
    1,515
    Post Thanks / Like
    That`s a good question and one I have some thought on...



    But it`s telephone time...



    I`ll have to get back to this thread.



    Also, I just picked up the Makita Bo6040 to try out,



    Makita`s dual purpose polisher - Combination Dual Action Polisher & Rotary Buffer







    Mike

  5. #5
    My L5-S1 is killing me! wifehatescar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    South Lyon, MI
    Posts
    1,307
    Post Thanks / Like
    Originally posted by Mike Phillips



    I`ll have to get back to this thread.





    I will await your answer :up

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    2,045
    Post Thanks / Like
    OK, I understand. But tell me, then, how did I do this Audi with only the D/A?



    Is the answer that the D/A CAN do the work, but that the rotary is so much faster and efficient that it`s not worth the time to use the D/A (it took a LONG time to do this)? Because, the D/A can definitely do the work. I only chose two "before" pictures, but I have a whole host of them. I`d say this car was severely damaged.



    Tom
    Attached Images Attached Images

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    2,045
    Post Thanks / Like
    ...
    Attached Images Attached Images

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    2,045
    Post Thanks / Like

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    2,045
    Post Thanks / Like

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    2,045
    Post Thanks / Like

  11. #11
    Spilchy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    4,284
    Post Thanks / Like
    Originally posted by Mosca

    OK, I understand. But tell me, then, how did I do this Audi with only the D/A?


    Good question! I routinely take out similar defects with a DA and proper pad / product combo and speed setting.



    What I find more difficult to remove with a DA are scratches compared to swirls.
    Seth

  12. #12
    Hooked For Life Bill D's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    The First Coast
    Posts
    12,199
    Post Thanks / Like
    On my Audi took me 45 mins just to eliminate 95% of ONE light scratch, maybe 1 1/2" long in my paint using a PC. I don`t know what I would do with several like that. I`m getting a rotary and going to learn how to use it
    Treat it like it`s the only one in the world.

  13. #13
    Administrator
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Stuart, Florida
    Posts
    1,515
    Post Thanks / Like
    That`s the deal with a PC, it will slowly remove most light scratches, with emphasis on the word slowly.



    A lot of how effective the PC is on removing scratches is dependent upon how hard the finish is.



    At a recent Viper Detail Day at Meguiar`s, I started a demonstration using a black Viper to show how to remove fine scratches with the PC and some #83.



    After wiping off the residue, there was literally no difference than when I started. Even with the rotary buffer, some #84 and a W-7006 cutting pad, it was extremely difficult to remove scratches.



    On the other hand, I buffed out a blue single stage Porsche last summer where #83 Swirl Free Polish on a W-8006 with the PC could have easily gone through the finish if you were not careful because the paint was so soft.



    What can and cannot be done with a PC is always a case by case situation.



    Mike

  14. #14

    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Cincinnati, OH
    Posts
    4,341
    Post Thanks / Like
    I`m gonna have to agree with Mike here, the PC can handle some light swirls/marring, but it`s SLOW. I mean real slow. In my expierence, so slow it`s not even worth it in most cases. Anything above light marring/swirls, forget it. You`ll be standing there for 10 hours polishing and probably still won`t get the results your looking for. I view the PC as a time saver (arm saver too :p ) but when the real work needs done, I reach for my Dewalt 849.



    Once you go rotary, you never want to go back.
    Taking my signature to it`s MAXIMUM POTENTIAL

  15. #15
    Hooked For Life Bill D's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    The First Coast
    Posts
    12,199
    Post Thanks / Like
    Originally posted by BradE

    . You`ll be standing there for 10 hours polishing and probably still won`t get the results your looking for.


    I went about half that each on the trunk and hood of my other car recently Rotary will be coming soon, Now, time to get some scrap or talk some clueless soul into letting me experiment on their car
    Treat it like it`s the only one in the world.

 

 
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. PC, Rotary, Buffers...Whats the difference?
    By jchaz in forum Detailing Product Reviews
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 03-25-2005, 08:50 AM
  2. Difference btween orbital buffers
    By madtremor in forum Auto Detailing 101
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 04-11-2003, 07:46 AM
  3. Orbital Buffers
    By jepetto in forum Car Detailing
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 02-12-2003, 02:00 PM
  4. Buffers & Polishers
    By Kenji in forum Car Detailing
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 06-07-2002, 11:31 AM
  5. Question about buffers/polishers
    By ecrosier in forum Car Detailing
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 05-19-2002, 11:43 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •