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  1. #16

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    Re: Degreaser of Choice - ?

    Ha Lonnie. Interesting you use Kano in the automotive world......of detailing. Kroil is my staple....
    There`s is another product I tried to replace fluid film made by Kano. I can`t recall what the product # was but I hated it so much - used acetone to remove it.

  2. #17

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    Re: Degreaser of Choice - ?

    Quote Originally Posted by mobiledynamics View Post
    Ha Lonnie. Interesting you use Kano in the automotive world......of detailing. Kroil is my staple....
    There`s is another product I tried to replace fluid film made by Kano. I can`t recall what the product # was but I hated it so much - used acetone to remove it.
    You aren`t thinking of "Weatherpruf" that is a spray-on wax-like clear coating used to prevent rust??
    They also make a rust prevention/lubrication product called "Prevox" that is less "permanent". I think this is the product a paper converting machine company (that is the actual name, PCMC) I worked at in engineering that the shipping department used to spray on parts or machine section assemblies that were shipped to humid areas or overseas in large wooden containers or metal shipping containers you see on boats to keep them from rusting. This rust prevention was then removed with mineral spirits at its final destination by the customer or PCMC machine installation/road service personnel.

    Speaking of rust prevention, I get A LOT of requests for a recommendation of a rust prevention product that will stop rust on older vehicles driven here in the winter in Wisconsin on the salted roads. I`ve see individuals use an after-market "Zebart-like" self-applied rust proofing. Hate the stuff as it has a very rough texture and I use an old brush to clean over it rather than having my wash media (cotton chenille or microfiber noodle mitt) get "snagged" in it. I hear a lot of vehicle owners say they spray rusted areas with WD-40, but I think it last as long as the next snowfall and salt they drive through, and requires continuous applications,
    I know Accumulator recommends a product from Eastwood Co (the restoration supply company) called "Rust Encapsulator", but have no experience with it.
    My suggestion? Primer and paint, even if it looks like a 50-50 job (from 50 feet away at 50 MPH it looks fine). No, I have never used Keno Labs "Prevox" myself, but it might be worth a try. Yes, I have done the WD-40 thing on my rusted vehicles, but I hate the "fishy" smell. Hey, ANY vehicle driven in Wisconsin winter continuously over the years will succumb to the much-maligned rust, despite the best efforts to keep rust-prone areas clean.
    I have also argued with vehicle owners that heated garages (above 60F) actually accelerate the formation rust on vehicles so kept after they are driven on salted roads and parked in such a garage without cleaning them. Rust needs heat and water and an acid to form. Vehicles kept outside in below 0F form less rust, but they are a bugger to start, and have accelerated engine wear, which can be mitigated by the use of a high-quality winter-weight (0W-20 or 0W-30) synthetic (Mobil1 is my preference) oil in the crankcase.
    GB detailer

  3. #18

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    Re: Degreaser of Choice - ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Lonnie View Post
    I know Accumulator recommends a product from Eastwood Co (the restoration supply company) called "Rust Encapsulator", but have no experience with it...
    In the "paint over rust" category, Eastwood`s Rust Encapsulator is a bit unique as it is UV-stable, and the others I`ve used are not. BUT UV-stablity aside, KBS Coatings` Rust Seal is *THE [STUFF}* IMO, although Rust Bullet is good for some jobs. All three of those will work well, all have their pros/cons.

    But for "what to use over rust when not doing all that", Eastwood`s Black Heavy-Duty Anti-Rust and their Frame Coater are what I`d recommend. I`ve used those for "oh, that`ll never last more than a year or two..you wasted your time " jobs and it has worked *GREAT*. Those dry/cure pretty much like paint, don`t stay tacky. KBS has a product called Cavity Coater that`s good, but it`s that beige/yucky-looking color; ditto for ValuGard`s Rust Inhibitor, although I really only like that product when used with a proper undercoating gun as I didn`t have good luck with their aerosol (sure, "user-error!" but this user doesn`t seem to err with other products ).

    EDIT: BTW, the "you can`t really fix that" rust in the bottom seam of the Tahoe`s rear left barndoor has stayed fixed for many Ohio winters now...the first fix didn`t last, but the second try has held up great despite salty water getting inside the door every winter.

    Similar rust was fixed on the Jag back in the early `90s, and it stayed fixed too.

    Never know until you try, sometimes you get lucky (and sometimes...not).

  4. #19

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    Re: Degreaser of Choice - ?

    I`ll have to check as it`s been ages if it was WeatherPruf.....I bought it to see if it was better than -FluildFilm- for how I would use it on OPE gear. Ha, on my new snowblower, I did a mix of PPF Film and also in some other areas, I also did some UHMW lining

  5. #20
    dansautodetailing.com Stokdgs's Avatar
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    Re: Degreaser of Choice - ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Lonnie View Post
    You aren`t thinking of "Weatherpruf" that is a spray-on wax-like clear coating used to prevent rust??
    They also make a rust prevention/lubrication product called "Prevox" that is less "permanent". I think this is the product a paper converting machine company (that is the actual name, PCMC) I worked at in engineering that the shipping department used to spray on parts or machine section assemblies that were shipped to humid areas or overseas in large wooden containers or metal shipping containers you see on boats to keep them from rusting. This rust prevention was then removed with mineral spirits at its final destination by the customer or PCMC machine installation/road service personnel.

    Speaking of rust prevention, I get A LOT of requests for a recommendation of a rust prevention product that will stop rust on older vehicles driven here in the winter in Wisconsin on the salted roads. I`ve see individuals use an after-market "Zebart-like" self-applied rust proofing. Hate the stuff as it has a very rough texture and I use an old brush to clean over it rather than having my wash media (cotton chenille or microfiber noodle mitt) get "snagged" in it. I hear a lot of vehicle owners say they spray rusted areas with WD-40, but I think it last as long as the next snowfall and salt they drive through, and requires continuous applications,
    I know Accumulator recommends a product from Eastwood Co (the restoration supply company) called "Rust Encapsulator", but have no experience with it.
    My suggestion? Primer and paint, even if it looks like a 50-50 job (from 50 feet away at 50 MPH it looks fine). No, I have never used Keno Labs "Prevox" myself, but it might be worth a try. Yes, I have done the WD-40 thing on my rusted vehicles, but I hate the "fishy" smell. Hey, ANY vehicle driven in Wisconsin winter continuously over the years will succumb to the much-maligned rust, despite the best efforts to keep rust-prone areas clean.
    I have also argued with vehicle owners that heated garages (above 60F) actually accelerate the formation rust on vehicles so kept after they are driven on salted roads and parked in such a garage without cleaning them. Rust needs heat and water and an acid to form. Vehicles kept outside in below 0F form less rust, but they are a bugger to start, and have accelerated engine wear, which can be mitigated by the use of a high-quality winter-weight (0W-20 or 0W-30) synthetic (Mobil1 is my preference) oil in the crankcase.



    Lonnie,
    When I was stationed at the top of the world in the Military, we had all these Dodge Power Wagon 4wd trucks that got us to places, and they all plugged into block heaters at night, and we never shut their engines off.. Yeah, it was that cold.. Way, Way, Way, below zero in winter.

    It was so cold, that when the temp got all the way UP TO Zero, it would feel like a heatwave and we would go outside in shorts and t shirts when we were not working..

    But, what about block heaters for vehicles in your State??? Wouldn`t this help them start easier? I would have to think it would...
    Dan F

  6. #21

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    Re: Degreaser of Choice - ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Stokdgs View Post
    [/B]

    Lonnie,
    When I was stationed at the top of the world in the Military, we had all these Dodge Power Wagon 4wd trucks that got us to places, and they all plugged into block heaters at night, and we never shut their engines off.. Yeah, it was that cold.. Way, Way, Way, below zero in winter.

    It was so cold, that when the temp got all the way UP TO Zero, it would feel like a heatwave and we would go outside in shorts and t shirts when we were not working..

    But, what about block heaters for vehicles in your State??? Wouldn`t this help them start easier? I would have to think it would...
    Dan F
    Yes, I used to have engine block heater on my vehicles that stayed out overnight outside. Those were the days of carburetor (what the heck is that?!) engines. Even removed the battery and took it into the basement. Just had to remember NOT to close the hood tight as hood-latch release cables sometimes snapped or the lever under the dash would break because it was so cold. It was a pain to install when it`s -30F in the morning to get to work, but I was much younger then. I learned to wear skin-tight fabric gloves to reduce the chance of frostbite on the fingers. It only takes one experience with metal hand tools and bare hand in sub-zero weather to learn how to deal with extreme cold. Having frozen hands/fingers "thaw out" is an extremely painful experience, akin to smashing your fingers with a hammer, but the pain lasts for about 2-3 minutes before the feeling comes back to your fingers and hands.

    Your experience in the military sounds like a documentary on PBS TV I saw on the Korean War when American troops were fighting the Chinese troops (allies to the North Koreans) in North Korean mountains in the winter. Just as many GI`s died from frostbite and exposure as they did in actual combat. Ambient temperature were anywhere from -30 to -50F and when a strong wing of 20-30 MPH was blowing, it felt like -90 to -100F with the wind chill. Some of the men who survived said they slept by taking off their boots and placing their feet in the armpits of their fellow GI and they would do the same for that fellow to keep from getting frostbite feet. Cannot imagine what it was like to just try to be outside, let alone live outside, for days on end end in sub-zero weather. They did come off those mountains. some GIs were shot and killed by sniper fire. They said there was not place to take cover on the trail going down or to try and locate the sniper, so they just kept marching downward and could not help their fellow GI who was shot because they become a target for the snipers. When they got to the valley where it was 35F, many striped down to their long-sleeve T-shirts, it felt that "warm". One GI said he had the utmost respect for his Chinese counterpart because he had to survive in the same sub-zero conditions as he did on that mountain and he said surviving the elements became more crucial than surviving the combat.
    GB detailer
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  7. #22
    dansautodetailing.com Stokdgs's Avatar
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    Re: Degreaser of Choice - ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Lonnie View Post
    Yes, I used to have engine block heater on my vehicles that stayed out overnight outside. Those were the days of carburetor (what the heck is that?!) engines. Even removed the battery and took it into the basement. Just had to remember NOT to close the hood tight as hood-latch release cables sometimes snapped or the lever under the dash would break because it was so cold. It was a pain to install when it`s -30F in the morning to get to work, but I was much younger then. I learned to wear skin-tight fabric gloves to reduce the chance of frostbite on the fingers. It only takes one experience with metal hand tools and bare hand in sub-zero weather to learn how to deal with extreme cold. Having frozen hands/fingers "thaw out" is an extremely painful experience, akin to smashing your fingers with a hammer, but the pain lasts for about 2-3 minutes before the feeling comes back to your fingers and hands.

    Your experience in the military sounds like a documentary on PBS TV I saw on the Korean War when American troops were fighting the Chinese troops (allies to the North Koreans) in North Korean mountains in the winter. Just as many GI`s died from frostbite and exposure as they did in actual combat. Ambient temperature were anywhere from -30 to -50F and when a strong wing of 20-30 MPH was blowing, it felt like -90 to -100F with the wind chill. Some of the men who survived said they slept by taking off their boots and placing their feet in the armpits of their fellow GI and they would do the same for that fellow to keep from getting frostbite feet. Cannot imagine what it was like to just try to be outside, let alone live outside, for days on end end in sub-zero weather. They did come off those mountains. some GIs were shot and killed by sniper fire. They said there was not place to take cover on the trail going down or to try and locate the sniper, so they just kept marching downward and could not help their fellow GI who was shot because they become a target for the snipers. When they got to the valley where it was 35F, many striped down to their long-sleeve T-shirts, it felt that "warm". One GI said he had the utmost respect for his Chinese counterpart because he had to survive in the same sub-zero conditions as he did on that mountain and he said surviving the elements became more crucial than surviving the combat.
    Mi Hermano, Lonnie,

    Ok, glad you have tried the block heater. I have to think if it worked good enough, it might help keep the oil warm enough to flow faster, when all those metal parts start rubbing on each other, at 0-dark-30 in the morning..

    Where I was stationed (Greenland), it was 6 months of darkness and coldest, then, 6 months of light, and not as cold but always way below zero..
    One absolutely Beautiful part up there --- the Aurora Borealis !!! Oh wow !!! It was Huge !!! So Clear!!! You could almost reach up and touch it...

    The coldest it was up there for me was -84 below zero F.. I remember, not far from zero degrees made it difficult to take a deep breath because the cold air hurt your lungs so much.. Had to be careful...

    First time in my life that I learned that if you touched the inside walls of your room where you slept, your fingers might just stick to it...

    One could never go out without a buddy, and try to keep track of the ropes that helped find your way through/around those huge snow drifts... If one got lost in the snow, he might not be found until the next spring/summer season..

    The entire base except for where I worked, and Finance, was run by Danish nationals... Some of the nicest men I have ever met...
    They had to sign a 5-year agreement to work up there, and they did it because the 50% tax in Denmark just killed them..

    It makes a difference to come from cold temps, in how your deal with it too..
    These guys came to work every day in the same white cotton clothing, the absolutely needed parka, and Wooden Clogs, a thin, white sock on their feet!!
    I don`t know how they did that, but perhaps a shot of Schnapps helped..

    That Korean war story - wow -.. I have a brother-in-law that served there, and to this day he has never talked about it... Perhaps now I know why..

    The entire time I was at the North Pole, during the Cold War, and the Ruski`s very arrogant and willing to just hit the red button and launch nuclear warhead rockets at us; it was a constant vigil we had to have, as we could look out North of us, and there they were...
    Everyone worked 12 hours on, 12 hours off..The entire 14 months for me..

    Something else I learned about that assignment - a LOT of aircraft fly that route to and from the USA and of course Canada...

    There was even a civilian airlines (Scandinavian Airlines, SAS), that had a terminal not far from another airbase, Sondestrom Fjord, AFB, and when they could land safely, they landed there, on their way to the USA, etc..

    The Air Force lost 3 - F105`s up there that year, that were flying either to or from Southeast Asia, needed to land at that airfield, but, because of weather so bad, they could not, and they ran out of fuel..

    We went out to look for them, and listen for transponders and never found them..

    The map of Greenland at Base Ops was absolutely Covered in colored push pins, hundreds of them.. All represent an aircraft`s last known location, before losing contact...
    Dan F
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