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Washing in freaking freezing weather


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#1 baseballlover1

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Posted 25 November 2007 - 11:28 PM

i was contemplating closing up for the winter but then i realized i have bills to pay all through winter and i havent saved enough to stop working. Im wondering if there are any like tips or something to not getting cold while washing cars. Also i was wondering, do you guys wear different shoes that are like water repellant or something because my feet are always soaked after i wash a car.

Sorry if these questions seem a little stupid, but i guess there's no such thing as a stupid question (however i don't believe this statement).

Thanks,
Daniel

#2 skylineawd

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 12:00 AM

I wash it outside the garage, then pull it inside to do the drying and the rest of the detail. I've heard of some people wearing dish washing gloves to wash with.

#3 rancid82

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 12:41 AM

wear some footwear that's waterproof. I use my doc martens....they're great for everything and my feet stay dry. I've used running shoes and it's just a no no...gets wet every time. I use sandals in the summer/spring.

Oh...and there's really nothing you can do about cold hands. You can try to use warm water to mix up your soap with but you're still gonna get cold. The rubber gloves are ok but for me, I like to feel what I'm doing.

#4 mirrorfinishman

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 05:42 AM

Daniel,

You would be smart to use a pair of rubber dish washing gloves and a pair of cotton gloves as inserts during the entire detailing process, including the wash. Just slip on the cotton gloves first, as they will act as a barrier between the rubber dishwashing gloves and your skin. This combo also helps to prevent any chance of chemicals coming in contact with your skin. Been doing it this way for 21 years. Believe me it works.

Also, get yourself work boots to be used while you are washing these cars. There is really no good reason for not having the clothes you need to stay warm and dry during the cold weather. As long as the temperatures are above 35 degrees, you should be able to dress warm enough to get out there and do some work. Hey, I have been out there this past week when the temps were in the 20's and never had a problem. On those cold mornings, I usually get started on the interiors before attempting to to wash when it's that cold.

The best advice is to dress in layers, such as wearing two sweat shirts, one hooded and one not. Always wear a hat and hood while you are out there. Wear insulated pants or even two pairs of pants, one thin pair under a heavier thicker pair. And it is always a good idea to position the car in full sun while working during the winter months.

#5 Jakerooni

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 06:35 AM

Yea I've always worn waterproof boots and shoes since I've started detailing. Even in warm weather the last thing I ever wanted was wet socks to slosh around in all day. Even just getting that waterproof spray they sell at show stores helps out tremendously. For winter I usually don a pair of UnderArmour made for cold weather (double check your labels because they are completely different between warm weather and cold weather underarmour)

Frank hit it on the head again with dressing in layers. I usually have a couple tees and then a hoodie I can peel off as I warm up. The real key to staying warm is to keep moving. really limit your breaks and keep it moving.

#6 DaGonz

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 06:54 AM

What bills would a 14 year old have?

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#7 Yal

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 07:03 AM

What bills would a 14 year old have?


Christmas? :)

#8 beachwolverine

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 07:40 AM

We just had our first cold snap in Memphis and I washed using a BHB on a pole - it kept my hands out of the water and was pretty comfortable.

#9 baseballlover1

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 08:05 AM

What bills would a 14 year old have?


Phone, and itunes bills. Dads hinting at he is going to make me pay 5 dollars for every car i detail because of utilities. But that hasn't taken effect yet.

#10 mirrorfinishman

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 08:46 AM

Hey Daniel,

Maybe the reason why some people don't take you very seriously when it comes to detailing as a profession is because you waste too much time responding to people questioning your age. Age should have nothing to do with someone's desire to detail cars for a profit.

Think about it, both myself and Jake, along with a couple of others took the time to reply directly to your inquiry. Instead of focusing on the positive information we supplied, you quickly tuned into the comments about your age. That may be the reason why so many people do not take you very seriously, when you continue to show them time and time again that you don't even take yourself seriously. In your case, maybe age is a problem.

#11 DaGonz

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 10:06 AM

Phone, and itunes bills. Dads hinting at he is going to make me pay 5 dollars for every car i detail because of utilities. But that hasn't taken effect yet.


You should be paying some of the expenses for the utilities you are using... after all, your parents are paying for them... and you are making money.

As for not saving the money... prioritize your expenses and look where you can save... for example, your cell phone bill. Do you really need to download ringtones and have text messaging? Can you listen to the radio instead of downloading tunes at a buck or so a pop?


You should put aside a portion of your earnings for supplies and utilitiies, save some in a bank or investment account, and spend some for fun. The real world is coming....

The Stable...
Platinum White Pearl 2014 Ford Edge SEL AWD

Tungsten Gray 2006 Ford Mustang GT "Mistress Lauren"
Oxford White/Ingot Silver 2009 Ford F150 XLT 4x4 Supercab


WaxWorks Automotive Detailing... for the shine that turns heads.


#12 MobileJay

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 10:15 AM

Hell if I would have started detailing when I was 14 I'd be doing hella good by now. Keep it up.
About the cold now. With the water, yeah its going to be cold and this might sound weird but its true. When I fill my bucket and start to wash the water is freezing on my hands. After about 5 min. when I put my hands back in the water I think my hands have gone numb by this time so the water actually feels warm and its very nice. The clothes, layers (as some have mentioned) is the way to go. I have underarmour long sleeve shirts I wear under a t shirt thats under a sweater/jacket. I was wondering the same things about shoes, I can't see wearing a $120 pair of Docs to wash a car. I mess up my shoes big time so that wouldnt be good for me.

#13 baseballlover1

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 11:36 AM

Hey Daniel,

Maybe the reason why some people don't take you very seriously when it comes to detailing as a profession is because you waste too much time responding to people questioning your age. Age should have nothing to do with someone's desire to detail cars for a profit.

Think about it, both myself and Jake, along with a couple of others took the time to reply directly to your inquiry. Instead of focusing on the positive information we supplied, you quickly tuned into the comments about your age. That may be the reason why so many people do not take you very seriously, when you continue to show them time and time again that you don't even take yourself seriously. In your case, maybe age is a problem.


Hmmm that is very interesting that you say that, and its completely true. I think the reason why i respond to the age comments is because i am used to defending myself about my age. But you are completely right, i need to learn how to tune comments about my age out. I will try harder on that.

Back to the thread, i think that i might try the rubber gloves with a cotton lining in them. Hmmm, i just got an idea. Would you guys be interested in buying like an insulated jacket that has like rubbing gloves that are attached to the sleeves by like a zipper or something so that you can put your arm to the bottom of the bucket without getting your whole arm wet. I am wondering this because i know some designers of jackets and i know a guy that would be perfect to make and manufacture these things.

#14 Saintlysins

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 04:12 PM

MirrorFinishMan gave as good advice as you’ll get, using the yellow dishwashing gloves and some thin cotton-glove inserts is the way to go. My only other advice is to add a quart to a gallon of hot water to the wash bucket (how you go about this is up to your creativity). THIS IS NOT ACCEPTABLE BELOW 35 DEGREES – at that temp, you shouldn’t wash the car. Your objective is to raise the water temp 5 to 10 degrees. You’ll be able to work with bare hands (my choice), and or just the yellow dishwashing gloves without inserts.
Sounding repetitive ... layer, layer, layer your clothes. It’s so easy to regulate your body temp by removing/adding one thin layer at a time than to try and do it with a bulky jacket/coat. Preventing the hands & feet from getting cold is priority, getting them wet will increase how quickly they get cold. Once they’re cold, the rest of you will feel cold too. Gloves and good thick socks in waterproof boots are key. My added recommendation on the waterproof boots is to get a true rubber sole, or one of the light-colored soles. Depending on the solvents you’re using to clean the wheels, you may soften the cheaper, plasticized boot soles and leave black marks on light colored carpets as you get in and out of cars.
At any age, it seems you’re doing what you like and making money doing it. You’re to be congratulated – most kids today don’t have motivation to clean up their rooms let alone the work ethic you do. Tell that to your Dad this when he brings up the utility bill again ... you may give him the perspective of what else you might be doing if he stifles your ambition and that may make him think twice. Or, detail his car(s) once a month as payment in full, after all, that’s worth a lot more than the money he’d get in return. Either way – I congratulate you on effort, ambition and determination.
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#15 baseballlover1

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 04:42 PM

Thank you very much! it means a lot to me to get a complement. My father "detailed" (this was 50 years ago) his fathers cars when he was a kid. This was in watchung NJ (near plainfeild), and thinks that it is my job (as his son) to detail his cars so the detailing his cars in exchange is out. I think its better for me to just pay him like 10 or 20 dollars a month.

And its funny that you use my room as an example. I am cleaning it as we speak, the layer of clothes on the floor got a little bad. lol

#16 itb76

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 08:03 PM

...THIS IS NOT ACCEPTABLE BELOW 35 DEGREES – at that temp, you shouldn’t wash the car....

I ONR wash my car in my attached garage when it's 25 out. If the car is warmed up and the garage has been closed it's warm enough to wash. With ONR you dry right away so the windows won't freeze. The garage has a drain but sometimes I will get ice on the floor. With ONR it's amazing how dry my shoes and pants stay. I use hot water, no gloves.

If you're washing outside obviously it has to be above freezing and you have the wind to contend with.
Lenny

"Still plays with cars."
'04 BMW 545/'98 Mercedes ML320/'99 BMW 323/'87 VW GTI (race)

#17 baseballlover1

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 08:10 PM

yea im beginning to consider ONR washing.

#18 eyesack

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 09:02 PM

For your feet, in my experience, wearing 'restaurant clogs' aka chef shoes has done the trick for me. you will find that they're light weight, and if you buy some with heels as opposed to open heel, and laces too, it helps a LOT. they're also mega-comfortable. I've been thinking about buying a space heater for my parent's garage, but it will short out the lights/buffer... maybe a kerosene heater?
I also dress as so:
1."wife-beater" (i hate the name, but you know what i'm talking about...)
2. flannel pajama pants
3. long sleeved shirt
4. heavy sweat-pants, look at Modell's sporting goods
5. short sleeved shirt on top of long sleeved shirt
6. hooded zipperless sweatshirt
7. ski-socks (any thick, sweat abosorbant sock will do)
8. work boots or restaurant shoes.
as for my hands, i've contemplated batting gloves since they're thin enough to still 'feel' the materials you're working with and provide some warmth.
9. A constant flow of coffee or hot chocolate... or if your mom's nice enough, some chicken soup. nothing keeps the body warm like hot liquids inside!

As for being 14, dude, you're awesome! i started when i was 18. If you have a love for cars and pretty, shiny things, then f''k everyone who hates on you! YOUTH POWER!!! lol

#19 tguil

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Posted 27 November 2007 - 05:45 AM

About boots -- I wear high rubber boots with really warm wool socks. You simply cannot beat rubber for keeping feet dry.

About the actual wash -- I head for the coin-op to get the bad stuff off and then use QEW.

Tom :cool:
One white Tacoma, one white Ram Hemi and two black Harleys...No sense complicating my life with color.

#20 JoshVette

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Posted 27 November 2007 - 06:05 AM

yea im beginning to consider ONR washing.



I've used ONR enough, it's okay if the car is relatively clean and not heavily soiled. Good for winter times I guess....

If you're claying the car, I find it sometimes faster to clay as you wash it panel by panel though, it's faster then using ONR and then reclaying every spot you just washed and dryed.
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