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Mink Oil on Leather


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#1 F 355

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Posted 20 January 2005 - 04:20 AM

Anybody try mink oil on leather?

I've used just about everything out there on leather. On the lambo I just bought the previous owner is a collector and had the car for 3 years and only used mink oil paste. It looks brand new and has a subtle feel and look.

A few days ago I went to a custom shop that has been on Speed Channel..they do ground up restorations and do everything in house (engine, frame, interiors) and the owner also mentioned to me that they use mink oil time to time on leather.

Comments?

#2 TOGWT

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Posted 20 January 2005 - 05:21 AM

Mink Oil- is an emulsion of lard and petroleum-based silicone oils. Like saddle soap and Lanolin it tends to be greasy. The silicone oils ‘seal’ the leather pores causing the product to ‘sit’ on the surface, making it unsuitable for upholstery seating surfaces.

If Mink oil has been used to clean/condition a leather surface, it should be removed with a citrus-based product (P21S® Total Auto Wash) to remove the silicone oils and grease, otherwise future conditioners will be unable to permeate the leather causing it to dry out, become brittle and crack.
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#3 Pondscum

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Posted 20 January 2005 - 06:07 AM

Here is what Lexol has to say about Mink oil:

Q. I've seen "Mink Oil" used in leather conditioners. Is Mink Oil a valid conditioning oil?
A. Yes it is. We do not use it in Lexol products but it is a valid conditioning oil. "Mink Oil" is a euphemistic name for liquefied pig fat and silicone. Like Lanolin, it's very greasy and typically unsuitable for leather upholstery. Mink oil is most often used on heavy boots or other hard-working leathers.

You can read the entire thing here:

Auto Leather Care Primer

#4 foxtrapper

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Posted 21 January 2005 - 06:59 AM

Today, mink oil is a phrase used generically to describe a "leather conditioner", whatever that means.

Historically, it used to be a product made by rendering the fat of a Mink. You can still find that if you look around, as minks are still a commercial item. It does a good job of waterproofing, which is of questionable importance on a leather upholstery. True mink oil also has an interesting aroma, which many folks won't care for. It is also an excellent treatment of dry chapped hands.

Beyond that, you get into the various fake mink oils, which can be as the others have described, as well as many other formulations of various chemicals and ingredients.

#5 F 355

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Posted 23 January 2005 - 02:22 AM

Originally posted by Pondscum
Here is what Lexol has to say about Mink oil:

Q. I've seen "Mink Oil" used in leather conditioners. Is Mink Oil a valid conditioning oil?
A. Yes it is. We do not use it in Lexol products but it is a valid conditioning oil. "Mink Oil" is a euphemistic name for liquefied pig fat and silicone. Like Lanolin, it's very greasy and typically unsuitable for leather upholstery. Mink oil is most often used on heavy boots or other hard-working leathers.

You can read the entire thing here:

Auto Leather Care Primer



Notice "it is a valid conditioning oil" and "typically" unsuitable for leather upholstery.... Typically means usually. If you go to the grocery store and buy Kiwi Mink oil in the shoe polish area this is what you will get...stuff made from pig fat.

The product I have is from Mink...only place I could find it was from France.

He goes on to say:

Q. Now I'm confused. If all of these conditioning oils are so bad, greasy, what do you use in Lexol Leather Conditioner?

A. The conditioning oils we're talking about, Neatsfoot Oil, Lanolin, Mink Oil, pressed lard oils, are not "bad" conditioning oils. If fact, they are very good conditioning oils

This car is like new and only had mink oil from day one. There is not a micro crack, split thread, nothing...

I've used Lexol, Leatherique, Connoly Hide food, Zaino, Meguiars, Griots, etc etc. I'm staying with it.

Like wax/polish. Find what works for you and stick with it.

#6 Bence

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Posted 23 January 2005 - 03:49 PM

F 355, what brand is your mink oil? Is it Pierre Fabre? I have found a Spanish manufacturer (Tarragó), but I don't know what that really is. Pig or mink? :nixweiss

THX




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