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Lug nuts are on way too tight...


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#1 JM19

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Posted 17 December 2004 - 12:01 PM

Well, I'm about to get ready to rotate my tires, and my worst fears about the project have come true. My lug nuts are on way too tight and it's near impossible to get them off without giving myself a hernia.

Does anyone have any advice on how to make the process easier? I was thinking that I could use some WD-40 to help loosen things up a bit, but I'm not too sure how safe it will be on my wheels.

If anyone has run into this same problem and has some helpful advice, I'd appreciate it. Thank you.

#2 ZaneO

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Posted 17 December 2004 - 12:13 PM

Find a long breaker bar.

WD-40 will probably be okay as long as you avoid the brakes and thoroughly wash the wheels when finished (will need to be protected again also).

I don't care if Sal dropped a deuce in my package


#3 VictoryRed

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Posted 17 December 2004 - 12:26 PM

Counter clockwise:o, stand on it, WD-40=Rust
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#4 JDookie

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Posted 17 December 2004 - 12:35 PM

First, use a penetrating lubricant like Liquid Wrench over the WD40 and second use an impact. If you don't have access to an impact a longer breaker bar is all you can do. Sometimes (I know this sounds weird) trying to tighten them just a hair will release the nut and allow you to remove them easier. Just remember to let the penetrating lubricant sit on there for a few minutes before you go wrenching on them.

#5 Bill D

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Posted 17 December 2004 - 01:25 PM

Kano Labs' Kroil is like WD-40 on steroids. :bow A few years ago I had to use this and the help of a 265 lb friend using a spinner wrench with a piece of pipe placed over it to get the wheels off! Damn tire shop! :mad: :down
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#6 Aurora40

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Posted 17 December 2004 - 02:01 PM

You DON'T WANT WD-40 on your wheel studs! It's on tight due to torque probably, not due to rust or binding. It'll be hard to clean the wheel studs completely after you spray WD-40 on them. Do you have a breaker bar? That will really help.

Make sure you check the wheel studs for any stress lines or anything. And try to make sure that never happens again. Three wheel studs snapped on the Regal, shearing the other two lugs and separating the wheel from the car. I suspect it was due to years of overtightening, though I can't be certain... :eek:

#7 ZaneO

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Posted 17 December 2004 - 04:00 PM

When you put those lugs back on, make sure they are around 100 lb. ft.

I don't care if Sal dropped a deuce in my package


#8 kartoon

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Posted 17 December 2004 - 04:07 PM

I second the breaker bar idea. If you don't have an impact wrench, a long bar will save you in many situations.
I got mine from Harbor Freight for a few dollars.
When you tighten the wheels use a torque wrench. For my car the recommended torque is 80 ft-lbs.

#9 JM19

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Posted 17 December 2004 - 05:29 PM

Unfortunately, I tried everything I could that was reasonable and they still did not come off. I suspect that the last place that rotated my tires must have put them on too tight with a machine.

I am actually getting quite fed up with the way many places tighten things on my vehicle. I had a problem two weeks ago before I was about to change my oil in that the drain plug was put on too tight also. It was really frustrating as I had to take my car to a local service station and they had to loosen it for me.

I was thinking of taking my car to a garage around here and seeing if they can help loosen them for me. It's somewhat disappointing as I was looking forward to rotating my tires on my own. However, I'd rather have someone with some expertise remove the lugs first before I hurt myself.
Jeff

#10 HRP

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Posted 17 December 2004 - 05:47 PM

I always tell the manager to hand torque the lug bolts and that I will check them to make sure I can remove them before I leave the shop. That usually works, but be sure you actually check them (at least 1 on each wheel). I only had to make them remove them and then put them back with a torque wrench once.
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#11 LouisanaJeeper

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Posted 17 December 2004 - 05:54 PM

anti seize
some like it, some dont, i do
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#12 kempie

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Posted 17 December 2004 - 06:07 PM

How about this time you take it to a shop that will use a torque wrench to tighten tham after they rotate them. Then next time you can do it..after you get a torque wrench.
Over tightening can cause warped rotors as well as broken bones.

#13 JM19

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Posted 18 December 2004 - 10:44 AM

I think I've found a solution to the problem. It requires a small investment of money, but I think it will be worthwhile in the end.

This impact wrench, available from Lowe's, seems like it will suit my needs. It seems well-suited for the home user, and it specifically states it can be used for stubborn bolts.

http://www.lowes.com...966-1126-IFT202

Does anyone recommend certain "accessories" I might need when I go to buy it?

As always, I will tighten with my torque wrench afterwards. If I ever have any more problems with tight bolts, at least I will have a quick and efficient solution at hand.
Jeff

#14 LouisanaJeeper

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Posted 18 December 2004 - 12:02 PM

Does anyone recommend certain "accessories" I might need when I go to buy it?
you know you need a compressor for that, right? and a 1/2 drive socket or 1/2->3/8" adapter
i would go with an IR brand impact
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#15 Vincent Vega

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Posted 18 December 2004 - 12:23 PM

I'll second the I/R brand. As a rule if I have tire service done I will always loosen and retorque lug nuts when I get home. 100 ft lbs. I would be reluctant to but a cheap Impact Wrench. It may not cost much now but, in two years when you have to buy another one..........

#16 ERASE

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Posted 18 December 2004 - 01:02 PM

http://www.epinions....nt_133949853316

Panasonic 15.6 volt Cordless Impact and Drill/Driver EY6535

I bought this and I find it amazing- one of the best tools I have ever bought.Panasonic makes really great drills- though one would never expect that. Many who have owned both prefer them to Dewalt, Makita, and Milwaukee.

Do get the accessory handle for it though- or the super torque 1100 inch pounds- could break your wrist.

You can drill with it- drill pilot holes- swap out the chuck with a single button- and use a 1/2 inch socket adapter on it as well- drives 4 inch lag bolts into pressure treated wood- and surely will unstick your lug nuts since it has more torque than most of the impact drivers out there.

The cool thing is there are three chucks on it- a drill bit chuck, a driver hex chuck, and the 1/2 inch socket (which is always on).

#17 Setec Astronomy

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Posted 18 December 2004 - 01:24 PM

My OPINION based on MY experience...if they are really on there, the impact wrench won't budge them. Rent a heavy duty breaker bar (3/4" drive) that's plenty long, and get the right socket, use penetrating oil if you need to. I understand Aurora40's comment about not being able to get the WD off the studs; usually the auto manufacturers specify torque values with unlubricated threads--if you lube them, you can effectively overtorque them and neck the studs or snap them, but the penetrating oil on the affected threads can be removed with a can of brake cleaner after ur done, so don't be afraid to use the penetrating oil if you have to. I think it's a good idea to make sure the tapered seating areas of the nuts and the wheels are free of crap, also, before you reassemble.

As Aurora mentioned, there are real safety issues with this, so if you have any doubts, make sure you take the car somewhere that can evaluate/fix properly.

I know of only one place that actually uses torque wrenches (EuroTire here in NJ)...in fact, thanks for reminding me about the Craftsman socket that cracked as punishment for me asking the gas station to rotate my tires while they were doing my brakes. Of course they rotated them differently than in my CAREFULLY DRAWN DIAGRAM, and when I went to fix them found that they were almost impossible to remove--hence the cracked socket that I need to exchange.

That's why whenever possible I do that kind of stuff myself...just thinking about my poor wheels and rotors at that ungodly torque :scared
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#18 dashotgun

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Posted 18 December 2004 - 03:00 PM

There is an even cheaper solution The gorrilla bar and a torque wrench from Tirerack.com The gorilla bar extends out like a breaker bar. I like simple mechanical solutions.

torque wrench


gorilla bar Posted Image
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#19 JM19

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Posted 18 December 2004 - 03:24 PM

Originally posted by dashotgun
There is an even cheaper solution The gorrilla bar and a torque wrench from Tirerack.com The gorilla bar extends out like a breaker bar. I like simple mechanical solutions.

torque wrench


gorilla bar Posted Image



So you are saying that the gorilla bar should be able to remove the lug nuts? I think this would be a wise solution as I don't really have the space right now for a compressor for the impact wrench.

#20 dashotgun

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Posted 18 December 2004 - 03:43 PM

I think there is a great chance they would work. I have had excellent luck with it and even if is does not work it is a good tool to have around, and for under 20 bucks with shipping it is a steal. I have their consumer grade torque wrench for putting the lugs back on as well.....
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supra 1993 TT sold
Acura 2005 TL nighthawk Black family cars




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