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Black shoe polish for trim


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#1 DSVWGLI

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Posted 03 November 2004 - 10:00 PM

I currently have black shoe polish on the textured trim below the bumpers on my Jetta. I've tried many trim restore products with little success on this area. :( Just curious if anyone else has tried this? I don't want to use this on every one elses vehicle, it was kind of a last resort. I've asked about Poor boys trim restore in another thread.
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#2 mirrorfinishman

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Posted 04 November 2004 - 12:46 AM

Have you tried Stoners Trim Shine?

#3 DSVWGLI

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Posted 04 November 2004 - 07:32 AM

No I haven't tried Stoners, where can you get it?
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#4 mgm121499

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Posted 04 November 2004 - 08:20 AM

Poorboys Trim Restore will put a smile on your face. If you have any Klasse all-in-one, try that first, because it will clean out the wax too.
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#5 mirrorfinishman

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Posted 04 November 2004 - 08:23 AM

Here's a link to their website;
http://www.stonersolutions.com/

You should also consider that sometimes when you are dealing with exterior trim, it is possible that the trim just needs to be thoroughly cleaned prior to applying a protectant. Most petroleum based spray lubricants work good for this task. Simply spray the 'textured trim below the bumpers' with your favorite lubricant, such as WD40. Let it soak in and then proceed to thoroughly wash your car, washing away all of the lubricant residue. This process will usually remove most of the dirt and surface contamination from the trim. After the trim is completely dry, then you can apply either Stoner Trim Shine or your favorite brand of exterior trim protectant.

#6 rotaryb

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Posted 04 November 2004 - 08:29 AM

I posted the very same question the other week in the University section and decided to try it myself with a thich shoe cream that contained black dye and had a nice foam applicator. The results were great...the stain was removed and the final finish was a nice satin black. You have to buff the product off well, I found that a towel dampened with QD worked well to get any residue off. It's rained a few times since, no running at all since I left no residue of the product behind.

Here is the link...

http://autopia.org/f...?threadid=45588

#7 foxtrapper

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Posted 09 November 2004 - 04:26 AM

I've done it with the Kiwi can wax. Can't say I liked it. It did make things look black. But it was messy, got on anything that touched it, and collected dust like crazy.

I have not tried one of the shoe dye wipes.

#8 rotaryb

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Posted 09 November 2004 - 08:01 AM

Again, the stuff I used was a thick cream - it didn't run or make any mess since it has a nice foam applicator. I buffed it off completely with a towel damp with QD. It's rained many times since, no runs (since there is no residue) and they are still nice and black, no stains.

The thin shoe polish liquids willmake a mess, this was great. I won't use it permanently, I'll get a trim restorer but I was just curious and it worked out really well.

#9 Pondscum

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Posted 09 November 2004 - 08:12 AM

I don't use petroleum based dressings on my plastic trim anymore since Autoint did a report on the hazards of using them. Now I use only water-based, PDMS type products as protectants. These include 303, Eagle 1 Protectant, Armor All Original, and a few others. Basically if the product feels watery, looks milky, and gives a satin finish, it's probably a water based PDMS. Many petroleum based products look clear, feel slick, and leave a shiny, slick surface on plastic.

If you're plastic trim looks faded and dirty, you might try giving it a good cleaning and treating it with one of the products I recommended. If it still looks faded after treatment, there are protectant products which have black dye in them, but I don't like them because every one I've seen is petroleum based and has to be reapplied regularly, plus they are messy and often stain your driveway.

If you're willing to spend a few bucks, this company can make trim paint to match the factory finish for about $55:
Plastic Paint

#10 rotaryb

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Posted 09 November 2004 - 09:10 AM

$55.00??? You can get a perfect factory looking finish with proper cleaning/sanding/masking and black flexible bumper paint which is available in a variety of flat/satin/semi/gloss finishes to match factory pieces. I've done it a few times on several cars and if you take the time and do it right, the results are fantastic. Cost is your time and a few bucks for the rattle cans :)

#11 Jesstzn

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Posted 10 November 2004 - 05:13 AM

On my Passat ( same lowers as the Jetta) I use Forever Black tire gel , not the restorer.

I just cleaned the lowers well to free them of anything and used a dampened sponge to apply.

Initially I did 2 layers and then about every 3 months I refresh it. Its a water based dye and works great to restore the natural color.

In the summer months I wash it about 3/5 times a week and as said it lasts 3 months or better. I don't dress it with anything after that.

This pix is after about 2+ months.



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#12 percynjpn

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Posted 10 November 2004 - 05:34 AM

I was interested in this thread because in Japan, they sell a thick paste (made by Soft 99) called simply "Tire Wax". It is (as best I can tell) the exact same stuff as "Kiwi"- type shoe polish. It looks, feels, smells - and even applies - just like paste shoe polish. It even needs to be brushed or buffed after application to the tire, again just like shoe polish (if you don't buff it, it just sits there, dull and clumpy, like Kiwi would on your shoes without a brushing).

I haven't tried it on trim, but on tires it leaves a very natural matte finish (though a bit "thick", IMHO) that lasts pretty well.

I find the app. process to be a bit of a pain, but for anyone who likes a "natural" look, I would guess that regular shoe polish could be used in the same way, for either tires or (perhaps) even trim.

#13 rotaryb

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Posted 10 November 2004 - 07:23 AM

True, but the handy applicator is great as it's a nice size for trim. This is where the cream works well since it's think enough to be in a small bottle w/ attached applicator but thick enough not to make a mess.




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