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Will a Clay Bar remove oxidation???


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#1 Player

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Posted 08 October 2001 - 07:21 PM

I'm going to be doing a full paint detail on my car with Zaino Brothers products, but a few parts of my car have faded (the parts that aren't metal). I assume those parts are fiberglass. It's a '92 Mitsubishi 3000GT SL (Firestorm Red). My question is how do I remove this faded part? Will the clay bar remove it?
Thanks,
Will Player

#2 Ron Ketcham

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Posted 08 October 2001 - 07:39 PM

It may appear to "remove" some oxidation, but only the very top portion which has become completely detached from the actual paint surface.

See "oxidation" in dictionary, the breaking apart of the molecular bond, etc, etc.

A clay is not agressive enough to do so.

You may wipe an "oil" type product on the surface to create an optical illusion of removing oxidations, but once the oils evaporate, the condition is still evident. (I.E, think of women's make-up)

There are two ways to remove oxidation short of sanding and repainting.

One is to "chemically" remove the majority and then do a light polishing with a rotary buffer, correct pad, product.

or

Two, use an agressive compound, cutting pad and abrade it from the surface, followed by polishing with a correct polishing pad and polishing product.

Ketch
"Logic dictates I have been at this detailing thing way too many years!":wink1:

#3 Guess My Name

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Posted 08 October 2001 - 07:42 PM

Good answer Ron.

I was hoping you would answer it. I do beleive you have the detailing science covered and I like your posts.
Neat Vehicle Freak

My Website Which needs some detailing as well.....
My Truck Album
2002 Chevy Avalanche

#4 Ron Ketcham

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Posted 08 October 2001 - 07:54 PM

I hope I have learned somethings during the past 40+ years of building,painting and being in the chemical business regarding cars, vehicles, their paint and trim care.

Just a lot of common sense regarding most concerns.

Not labels, not how something works on one or two vehicles, but lots and lots, thousands of them, it is really just thinking things through.

But, I also enjoy having the opportunity to share with all of you what I provide the vehicle manufacturers. Seems that a college degree does not cover this part of the vehicle world , the real world.


:bounce
"Logic dictates I have been at this detailing thing way too many years!":wink1:

#5 YoSteve

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Posted 08 October 2001 - 07:58 PM

haha Ron, I work with the big three at work through fastener engineers, a college degree doesn't cover it there either :D

#6 Player

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Posted 08 October 2001 - 07:59 PM

I appreciate you replying so quickly. I have some stuff that a friend gave me, some type of rubbing compound that I've used before. He said that it takes a thin layer of paint off. I've used it on my spoiler before, followed by waxing and it look a hundred times better than before and stayed pretty good for a few weeks and then started going down hill again. I don't know if I should use that and then try claying it and then move in to the Zaino or what.
Thanks Again!!!
Will Player

#7 Cybercowboy

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Posted 08 October 2001 - 08:46 PM

He knows what he's talking about. 99% of the posts here assume your paint is in good shape, with maybe a few swirls.

Clay removes contaminants. That's about it. But it is really good at prepping good but slightly neglected paint. Kinda like my vehicles were.

Ron, how you doing?
2002 Torch Red Corvette convertible
1997 Red/Tan Expedition
1993 Red Eclipse (wife's)
Zaino - tried it...loved it.

#8 Andre'

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Posted 08 October 2001 - 11:14 PM

Hi Player. What type of compound is it ? If it's a light polish like 3M's Imperial hand glaze , you may be creating an illusion of re moving the oxidation , like Ron said. Or you'r paints clear coat is failing , if so the only way to fix the problem it is to have those parts repainted. Try a good compound like 3M's Finesse IT2 or 3M's fine cut coumpound , than use a good wax or sealant , if that does not last very long you must repaint the parts.

good luck , i hope this helps.
Andre'

#9 Player

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Posted 09 October 2001 - 02:17 PM

It says "3M Body Repair Finish Restorer" (removes swirl marks and light oxidation).

So what do you think???
Will Player

#10 YoSteve

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Posted 09 October 2001 - 02:31 PM

I used it to remove orange oxidation (or set in metal specs, I guess) on a white saturn. It didn't do much for swirls (didn't use a PC or apply 5-7 times), but worked well on the oxidation. What I liked that product for the best is the black shiny plastic found on side mirror or inbetween door windows on 4 door cars (don't know what that's called).
Pay Attention Klasse!

2000 Satin Silver Passat GLX

Wash This Way

#11 Guess My Name

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Posted 09 October 2001 - 02:39 PM

Steve it is called a "black shiny plastic thingy" lol
Neat Vehicle Freak

My Website Which needs some detailing as well.....
My Truck Album
2002 Chevy Avalanche

#12 Ron Ketcham

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Posted 09 October 2001 - 05:45 PM

That would be the "B" pillar, the one at the windshield is the "A" pillar and the back one is either referred to as the "C" pillar (but some of the SUV's screw up this old way, too many windows, etc) and the "C" is sometimes referred to as the "sail" panel.

The material applied to "B" pillars may be an applicae or painted metal, like on a PT Crusier.

Some, like older Buick Regals used an anodized clip on panel.

Ketch

:bounce here's my buddy again!
"Logic dictates I have been at this detailing thing way too many years!":wink1:

#13 YoSteve

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Posted 09 October 2001 - 06:21 PM

okay smartie pantses, what are they called in the UK :D

thanks, for clearing that up. I have a black B-pillar on my Passat.

(acutally GMN, it's a inside joke with me at work. sometimes I don't use any nouns in sentences, just pronouns and "pro-verbs", "Thingy that thingy looking thingy over there!" one guy at work just lookes at me puzzled, he's the same guy who thinks I buff my car too much)

#14 Ron Ketcham

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Posted 09 October 2001 - 07:01 PM

Well, you know how "correct" they are.

They call them those "thing-a-bobs" that are below the hood.

At least that is what I heard


Ketch
:bounce I like this little bugger!
(oopss, in UK, a bugger is something else)
"Logic dictates I have been at this detailing thing way too many years!":wink1:




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