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Bon Ami Left scratches


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#1 Dalton

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Posted 06 October 2003 - 04:03 AM

At the3 advise of many on the board I used Bon Ami on my windshield yesterday. Problem is, I now have millions of tiny sractches on the windshield. Is there anything I can do to get rid of them? In the sun they look similar to having lint on the window but it aint lint.

Help

#2 kgb

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Posted 06 October 2003 - 04:19 AM

It sounds like you did not soak the Bonami enough. I went to use that stuff on my window one time and said, "Hells no." Just seemed too rough. What problem were you having? I found Stoner's Invisible Glass gets rid of everything and works AWESOME for windows.
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#3 Dalton

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Posted 06 October 2003 - 06:05 AM

I had really bad grime on the window that stoners didnt get off. I know I know should have clayed. Is there anything that I can do at this point or do I need a new windshield?

#4 DFTowel

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Posted 06 October 2003 - 06:05 AM

:shocked Why would you use a powder cleaner on your windshield? Would you use Ajax? :scared

#5 kgb

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Posted 06 October 2003 - 06:10 AM

Originally posted by DFTowel
:shocked Why would you use a powder cleaner on your windshield? Would you use Ajax? :scared



Bon Ami has been used for years and years and years. I went to use it then got scared and did not.
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#6 Dalton

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Posted 06 October 2003 - 06:14 AM

I know. I am an idiot. If you do a search here on Bon Ami many people recommend it. I followed that advise and got burned I guess. Questions still remains Can I do anything about these scratches now? Lesson LEarned I guess

#7 bretfraz

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Posted 06 October 2003 - 06:27 AM

As you have found, modern auto glass is rather soft. Using an abrasive cleaner can cause damage. Now.... what to do. A couple suggestions:

1. You can try an auto glass polish (the product you should have used in the first place). Look for polishes from Autoglym, Zaino, Detailers Pride, and Griots. I can't assure you these will remove the scratches but I do know they're safe for auto glass and are worth a try. You can apply them by hand or PC.

2. Find a local detailer or glass shop that polishes glass. There are a few glass polishing systems out there using stuff like cerium oxide which can fix your problem. It takes an experienced hand to use it right but with a polisher and the right product the glass can be fixed.

BTW, I did a search on "bon ami" and found many threads and comments suggesting you don't use Bon Ami and that there are TSB's from automakers like BMW stating it will scratch.

#8 Dalton

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Posted 06 October 2003 - 06:45 AM

Thank you Brefraz I appreciate your response.

#9 kgb

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Posted 06 October 2003 - 07:04 AM

Don't feel like an idiot man. Not only did you elarnf rom your mistakes but we all learned from it. That is what this site is here for and I for one, appreciate you posting this cause now I know better too.
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#10 Bill D

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Posted 06 October 2003 - 07:41 AM

The glass and multi surface spray cleaner from Bon-Ami ( similar to Invisible Glass) is supposed to be top notch for regular window cleaning.
Unsuccessful at converting my neighbors to Autopians :sadpace:


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#11 Lowejackson

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Posted 06 October 2003 - 11:51 AM

Originally posted by 2001civicex
Don't feel like an idiot man. Not only did you elarnf rom your mistakes but we all learned from it. That is what this site is here for and I for one, appreciate you posting this cause now I know better too.



100% agree. Yes it was a mistake but we have all made mistakes, in fact there are several threads all about the mistakes we have made.

In terms of your glass, bretfraz is correct, at worst you will need new glass so it is worth a little experimentation first. Do not put up with a damaged windscreen. A shinny car is great but a smashed car is no good.

#12 2wheelsx2

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Posted 06 October 2003 - 01:14 PM

Originally posted by Dalton
If you do a search here on Bon Ami many people recommend it.



Dalton, I think this is a case of mistaken identity. I think the recommendation is the Bon Ami "glass cleaner", but you used the Bon Ami "abrasive cleaner" which is like Ajax.
Gary

MF is an acronym only safe to use on Autopia.
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#13 Lynn

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Posted 06 October 2003 - 07:37 PM

Hey, bretfraz! :wavey You say "As you have found, modern auto glass is rather soft." What's "modern"? I've used Barkeeper's Friend on some 70s/80s windshields successfully, and I know other Autopians are taking care of antique cars. So .... when did windshield glass become "soft"? Is there a sorta rough "cutoff date" about when we should treat the windshields more carefully?
"The perfect finish is a process and not a product." -- Jngrbrdman, 12.30.02
'75 Jaguar XJ6C, red
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#14 Bill D

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Posted 06 October 2003 - 08:18 PM

I read Audi windshields are "soft" unfortunately and not as durable as windshield glass made in the USA :(
Unsuccessful at converting my neighbors to Autopians :sadpace:


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#15 bretfraz

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Posted 07 October 2003 - 05:23 AM

Originally posted by Lynn
Hey, bretfraz! :wavey You say "As you have found, modern auto glass is rather soft." What's "modern"? I've used Barkeeper's Friend on some 70s/80s windshields successfully, and I know other Autopians are taking care of antique cars. So .... when did windshield glass become "soft"? Is there a sorta rough "cutoff date" about when we should treat the windshields more carefully?



From what I've gathered from speaking to people when writing The Glass Cleaner Test, its been in the last 10 years or so. It's really mfr dependent. One vivid clue of soft glass is if you hear/read people complaining about chips and cracks that seem excessive on a certain make and model of car. Of course for some that's a "day late and a dollar short" but at least it's an indicator of sorts.

A caring product mfr will frequently test their products on current glass and reformulate if needed. I know of one product mfr who has reformulated their glass polish FOUR TIMES over the past few years in order to prevent their polish from scratching soft glass.

#16 Old Rattle Flat

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Posted 07 October 2003 - 05:56 AM

The following is a quote I just took of the RainX FAQ board. I notice that they differentiate between Bon-Ami Cleaning Powder and Bon-Ami Cleanser.

"1). How do you remove Rain-X® Glass Treatment from exterior glass?
Rain-X® Glass Treatment can be removed from exterior glass by using either Rain-X® Glass Polish (Under "Glass Cleaner") or Bon-Ami Cleaning Powder or Soft Scrub cleaner. (Bon-Ami Cleaning Powder is sold at True Value Hardware Stores and Ace Hardware Stores. It can be obtained by calling Agelong Catalog at 1-800-892-8022. If you cannot find this product, Bon-Ami Cleanser - a different product - can be used, only if you add enough water to make it a "soapy" solution). If you require further assistance or have any additional questions, please call 1-800-416-1600."
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#17 Bill D

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Posted 07 October 2003 - 08:33 AM

Heard about the Soft Scrub for windows. I did use it once with good results on a very dirty windshield.
Unsuccessful at converting my neighbors to Autopians :sadpace:


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#18 Lynn

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Posted 08 October 2003 - 07:46 PM

Originally posted by bretfraz
A caring product mfr will frequently test their products on current glass and reformulate if needed. I know of one product mfr who has reformulated their glass polish FOUR TIMES over the past few years in order to prevent their polish from scratching soft glass.


Well, bummer! :( That means if you're dealing with a 70s car, today's cleaners just might not touch it. Right?
"The perfect finish is a process and not a product." -- Jngrbrdman, 12.30.02
'75 Jaguar XJ6C, red
'93 champagne Mercedes-Benz 190E, '70 VW red Kharmann Ghia

#19 Dave Holmes

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Posted 08 October 2003 - 09:04 PM

Lynn,

I have to agree with bretfraz about modern auto glass. It may be manufacturer specific, but in my case, age plays a factor, too. My '97 Maxima has a very chip susceptible windshield (speckled pits would be more like it), and scratches easy, as did my '96 Maxima. My wife's '88 Nissan p/u's windshield doesn't have the pitting problem at all, and I removed water spots with a wet S.O.S. pad with no scratches. (disclaimer: I do not recommend that as a viable cleaning method without testing first, and only if you're prepared to replace the glass).
My '78 Camaro's windshield may have been bulletproof. I constantly heard rocks hitting it, and never found any marks, but my Maxima's windshield has needed repaired twice so far. And I owned the Camaro for twice as long!

These are just my observations from a limited number of vehicles. I could say Nissan glass is to blame, but that wouldn't explain my wife's '88 not having a problem. I can only speculate that newer glass is somehow different.

Dave

#20 Lynn

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Posted 08 October 2003 - 09:38 PM

So ... sounds like I can safely use 100-grit sandpaper on the '70 VW Karmann Ghia and '75 Jags ... right? :D
"The perfect finish is a process and not a product." -- Jngrbrdman, 12.30.02
'75 Jaguar XJ6C, red
'93 champagne Mercedes-Benz 190E, '70 VW red Kharmann Ghia




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