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Suggestions on "Concealing" Clear Coat failure


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#1 ChevyFan

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Posted 17 September 2011 - 11:33 PM

I have detailed quite a few cars where the owners bring me their cars hoping to "fix" clear coat failure spots on vehicles... I explain to them that the only way to do this is to repaint it... Many of them are unwilling to do this, and the only reason they broght there vehicles to me for a "detail" was specifically for this reason. ( Hence the reason that they probably have Clearcoat failure )LOL. Anyway, I want to here what some of you have done to "lesson the look" of this. At least if I can still give them a detail that looks better then it was, I can get some money from them. So far any LSP I have tried to use dosent help the look at all. Does anybody have a system that has worked in concealing Clear cloat failure, or at least making it not look so bad?? Or will even attempting to do this lesson my reputation as a detailer... Hope this isnt a dumb question to ask

#2 wascallyrabbit

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Posted 18 September 2011 - 05:40 AM

opti guard. read this http://www.autopia.o...oat-review.html

#3 Lotuseffect

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Posted 18 September 2011 - 06:45 AM

I don't recommend opti-coat for these instances and I'll explain why.

It usually doesn't mask it completely. The customer in most of these cases I have had are looking for a miracle cure for years of neglect. We know there isn't one. My upsell price for opti-coating of a car is $200. I don't know what others charge. This same customer is not looking to spend that much usually on top of my detailing fee for at minimum a one step polish before the opti-coat.

For nearly the same price they could go to an electrobake shop and get a repaint.

I make sure they thoroughly understand ALL THIS. Then if they still want it, I'll do it.

However, this type of customer usually has fantasy expectations which won't be met for the price they want to pay. Not to mention clearcoat failure is a below the surface problem.

However to the OP original question. I usually like the way opti-seal masks the failure the best. It doesn't look remotely good because when you polish this vehicle and restore the paint that is salvageable it creates an even worse contrast to the paint which is failed.

I just explain to them as much as possible all the outcomes I have just laid out. Most of the time they pass in my service. Which is ok with me because I would rather have no customer than one who is dissatisfied. The ones who do agree for my work have a clear understanding I am merely trying to protect their vehicle to slow down the process of the clearcoat failure and not mask it.

If you can explain that to them thoroughly they will be satisfied because in the end I want to protect this vehicle from further harm rather than make it look like a showroom vehicle.

Which is most of the time what they want.

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Owner/Operator George Koutsourais
www.lotuseffectdetailing.net


#4 Richard Grasa

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Posted 18 September 2011 - 07:41 AM

Well, the used car dealer next to me uses automatic transmission fluid on failing clearcoat to hide it and it actually does a pretty good job... for a few days. That being said, I would never use it nor would I try to conceal the failing clear on a customer's car even if they asked me to as the only proper fix is a respray. IMO trying to hide it would put me in the same category as the hack down the street, but that's only my opinion. I wouldn't want someone badmouthing me because a week later the problem is visible again because I didn't "fix it properly".
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#5 autoaesthetica

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Posted 18 September 2011 - 08:49 AM

My suggestion is to walk away from this as well. You cannot conceal clearcoat failure and any false-feeding you do to the paint will show again in literally days once it has a chance to degrade or flash out.
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#6 Ron Ketcham

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Posted 18 September 2011 - 08:51 AM

Well, the used car dealer next to me uses automatic transmission fluid on failing clearcoat to hide it and it actually does a pretty good job... for a few days. That being said, I would never use it nor would I try to conceal the failing clear on a customer's car even if they asked me to as the only proper fix is a respray. IMO trying to hide it would put me in the same category as the hack down the street, but that's only my opinion. I wouldn't want someone badmouthing me because a week later the problem is visible again because I didn't "fix it properly".

Good for you!
I always taught in my classes the importance of having a lighted 30X magnifier on hand when dealing with any potential customer.
In the PrepExcellence Manual students received when taking the course, was a series of close-up photos of various paint issues, with verbage explaining what,why and how, if possible to repair, the process/procedure.
We taught to use the magnifier and have the client look at the issue through it.
Then, go to the manual, either have them read the verbage regarding the issue or read it to them.
A lot of feed back over 13 years regarding this technique of working a client and in most cases, if it was followed as taught, the potential client become a satisfied customer, and would spread the word of how professional and knowledable the detailer was.
Grumpy

#7 Accumulator

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Posted 18 September 2011 - 08:54 AM

I have areas of failure on the beater-Audi. I debated using some touchup clear, but decided to just skip it and do the best I could merely correcting the whole vehicle (this was back when I was doing a freebie detail for the original owner). While the failure spots are sure in marked contrast to the rest of the paint on those panels, truth is that 99% of the time people just see a "nice shiny car" and those spots just aren't a big deal. After living with them for a few years now, they aren't even a big deal to *me* any more and my painter came right out and said I'd be nuts to have him repaint the panels in question over "those little things".
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#8 ChevyFan

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Posted 18 September 2011 - 11:23 PM

Thanks everyone for your input...Really appreciate how the people on here that post everytime Ive asked a question respond with very helpfull info. There are truly some awesome detailers on this forum and im glad that I joined... Ive learned so much ( minus the hands on experience), and I have noticed my paint corrections are looking so much better in just the time since I've been on the forum. I just recieved my GG 6in and 3in and the Meguiars MF DA system! Did my Yukon and black lexus this weekend, and Im amazed at how well the system worked, and quickly. Couldnt get some of the deeper scratches out without using the rotary first, but all in all, I like the MF DA system a lot.

#9 Darkstar752

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Posted 19 September 2011 - 07:54 AM

My suggestion is to walk away from this as well. You cannot conceal clearcoat failure and any false-feeding you do to the paint will show again in literally days once it has a chance to degrade or flash out.


x2 on this, there's just some things in life you have to live with.

#10 Scottwax

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Posted 19 September 2011 - 08:46 AM

I have areas of failure on the beater-Audi. I debated using some touchup clear, but decided to just skip it and do the best I could merely correcting the whole vehicle (this was back when I was doing a freebie detail for the original owner). While the failure spots are sure in marked contrast to the rest of the paint on those panels, truth is that 99% of the time people just see a "nice shiny car" and those spots just aren't a big deal. After living with them for a few years now, they aren't even a big deal to *me* any more and my painter came right out and said I'd be nuts to have him repaint the panels in question over "those little things".


Same with the Maxima I just wrecked. Clear coat was obviously thinning on the horizontal surfaces (hey, when you want a 6 speed car, there are so few of them on the market...) but some very light polishing followed by Opti-Coat added very noticeable gloss and those areas beaded just as well as the rest of the car. I saw the signs of clear coat thinning but most people didn't.

Back to the topic, the only way to truly conceal clear coat damage is to repaint the car. Better to be honest with the customer and maybe get their future business than to take on a task you can't properly address and end up with a talkative and unhappy former customer.

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I test for Optimum, Clearkote, Meguiars

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#11 Accumulator

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Posted 19 September 2011 - 08:53 AM

I always taught in my classes the importance of having a lighted 30X magnifier on hand...


Much to my surprise, I find that I do better with a magnifier of somewhat lower power. My 30X is handy for some stuff, but I use my 15X one a whole lot more, it quickly became my fave.
The most interesting man in all of Autopia Land. (<--I didn't enter that!)




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