Jump to content



Photo
- - - - -

that wet look


  • Please log in to reply
11 replies to this topic

#1 arnie

arnie

    Registered User

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 9 posts

Posted 16 January 2011 - 11:43 AM

Hi all,
what combo of products would give my car that real deep wet look? I currently use, clay bar, meguiars paint cleaner, super resin polish, gloss protection then autoglym high def wax. It does look good when finished but lacks that nice wet look. The car is a darkish blue metalic
thanks very much:wavey

#2 Scottwax

Scottwax

    Registered User

  • Members
  • 33,313 posts

Posted 16 January 2011 - 12:39 PM

Making it swirl free is the first step. Finish whatever you do with Optimum Car Wax, gives a very wet look.
www.scottwax.com
I test for Optimum, Clearkote, Meguiars

#3 Dan

Dan

    Registered User

  • Members
  • 6,153 posts

Posted 16 January 2011 - 12:48 PM

Anything high in oils and/or silicone will give you a nice wet look. As Scott mentioned OCW is a good choice. HD Poxy also gives a very nice wet look.

#4 Legacy99

Legacy99

    Registered User

  • Members
  • 2,876 posts

Posted 16 January 2011 - 03:00 PM

Making it swirl free is the first step. Finish whatever you do with Optimum Car Wax, gives a very wet look.

+1 it's 90% prep. After polishing on a dark colored car, you could put Turtle Wax on one of Scott's job and it would look dripping wet.

#5 blucpe

blucpe

    Registered User

  • Members
  • 584 posts

Posted 16 January 2011 - 03:11 PM

as i'm sure scottwax will agree, cause i got this combo from him, ck cmw buffed off w/ ocw. oh yeah very wet. also i tried ag hd recently and was very impressed with it, very reflective and very glossy, and easy to work with and if i may vic's chaos more work 3 coats by bare hand or with red lc pad on pc speed 5 small sections at a time, very wet. hope that helps.

#6 arnie

arnie

    Registered User

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 9 posts

Posted 17 January 2011 - 04:24 AM

Making it swirl free is the first step. Finish whatever you do with Optimum Car Wax, gives a very wet look.

thanks for the replies.
just so i have got this straight. wash, claybar(fine) , paint cleaner, SRP, ag gloss protection and then top off with optimum car wax.

thanks very much

#7 gigondaz

gigondaz

    Registered User

  • Members
  • 472 posts

Posted 17 January 2011 - 05:17 AM

Hi all,
what combo of products would give my car that real deep wet look? I currently use, clay bar, meguiars paint cleaner, super resin polish, gloss protection then autoglym high def wax. It does look good when finished but lacks that nice wet look. The car is a darkish blue metalic
thanks very much:wavey


That elusive wet-look starts with:
1. Colour of car
2. Quality of the paint system used.

The above 2 criteria must be of sufficiently high standards to serve as a foundation, paving the way for detailing to create that "wet look".

Absence of/minimal orange-peel also contributes greatly to a "wet-look".
Of course, proper compounding + polishing + jewelling all contributes to the final effect.

IMO, on an average OE paint system on a "not-too-expensive car", if sanding and proper compounding are not done, it'll merely be a nice, healthy gloss. It can look great....but I still can't call it a wet look.

Note:
Perhaps this is the reason why many Zaino users expressed their disappointment, mistakenly believing they can just follow the Zaino methodology to the letter and magically end up with a super wet look.

#8 Barry Theal

Barry Theal

    Registered User

  • Members
  • 3,945 posts

Posted 17 January 2011 - 06:23 AM

That elusive wet-look starts with:
1. Colour of car
2. Quality of the paint system used.

The above 2 criteria must be of sufficiently high standards to serve as a foundation, paving the way for detailing to create that "wet look".

Absence of/minimal orange-peel also contributes greatly to a "wet-look".
Of course, proper compounding + polishing + jewelling all contributes to the final effect.

IMO, on an average OE paint system on a "not-too-expensive car", if sanding and proper compounding are not done, it'll merely be a nice, healthy gloss. It can look great....but I still can't call it a wet look.

Note:
Perhaps this is the reason why many Zaino users expressed their disappointment, mistakenly believing they can just follow the Zaino methodology to the letter and magically end up with a super wet look.


Ding Ding DIng! Thats the perfect answer again Gigondaz!!

#9 gigondaz

gigondaz

    Registered User

  • Members
  • 472 posts

Posted 17 January 2011 - 07:28 AM

Ding Ding DIng! Thats the perfect answer again Gigondaz!!


Thanks Barry!

On another note, if push comes to shove:mad1:, and the car owner insists on simply using ONE product that will give the so-called "wet look" that will "last" a long time, I'll use the new generation of coatings.

Today, a black Nissan GTR35 customer insisted on such a thing (above) and would not allow any form of machining as he believes any machine buffing will thin the clear. He's not bothered with the super fine scratches and just want a "wet look" that "lasts".

I respected his wishes and simply proceeded with DA (Klasse AIO) to cleanse the paint, IPA wipedown and then Matrix Micro Coating.
Fast, Simple and BIGGG BUDGET.

Even with 1 layer, it's got a very impressive wet-look.
Tmrw, I'll do one more layer of MMC, and I'll post photos:har:

#10 Accumulator

Accumulator

    Registered User

  • Members
  • 35,437 posts

Posted 17 January 2011 - 08:51 AM

just so i have got this straight. wash, claybar(fine) , paint cleaner, SRP, ag gloss protection and then top off with optimum car wax...


Some sorta-random thoughts follow:

-Note you didn't include any correction in the above list of processes. I too think that you need to reduce the (pretty much inevitable) marring before you'll get the look you're after.

-While SRP doesn't clean as well as some other products, using a paint cleaner before it smacks of redundancy unless you have some specific situation that requires something special.

-Much as I like SRP, it doesn't always give the "ultimate wet gloss" effect the way some other products do. That's one reason I like SRP on vintage cars. It can leave different looks on different paint, and maybe it's just not what *you* prefer on your vehicle. IME/IMO, KAIO is generally more likely to give a wet/glossy look in most cases.

-Sometimes, layering on different products gets "too much stuff between the paint and your eyes" and changes the appearance in a way that's counterproductive. Less can be more, and SRP + EGP + OCW might be too much for what you want to see.

-Once you get the paint corrected (and I mean *corrected*, not just "pretty OK in some lighting" but truly as marring-free as possible), you should see it looking "wet" and then all you need to do is find a LSP that preserves and protects that look, though
certain glazes/LSPs can amp up (or, if you pick the wrong stuff, tone down!) that look.

-If you can't do the correction properly, then yeah, you need to find products that will mimic the look of flawless paint (in this regard), but those solutions are generally pretty short-lived and thus need redone frequently (e.g., the Meguiar's Trade Secret Oils approach).

-Note all the "what *you* want.." comments in the preceding. Hard to say what another person will like on a given paint/vehicle.
The most interesting man in all of Autopia Land. (<--I didn't enter that!)

#11 gigondaz

gigondaz

    Registered User

  • Members
  • 472 posts

Posted 18 January 2011 - 02:56 AM

That elusive wet-look starts with:
1. Colour of car
2. Quality of the paint system used.

The above 2 criteria must be of sufficiently high standards to serve as a foundation, paving the way for detailing to create that "wet look".

Absence of/minimal orange-peel also contributes greatly to a "wet-look".
Of course, proper compounding + polishing + jewelling all contributes to the final effect.

IMO, on an average OE paint system on a "not-too-expensive car", if sanding and proper compounding are not done, it'll merely be a nice, healthy gloss. It can look great....but I still can't call it a wet look.

Note:
Perhaps this is the reason why many Zaino users expressed their disappointment, mistakenly believing they can just follow the Zaino methodology to the letter and magically end up with a super wet look.


To illustrate my point above about using coatings, if customer insists on no rotary buffing and merely wants to apply a layer of "something" that'll give a "wet look"
Lexus SC430.
Absolutely no rotary buffing at all. Klasse AIO + 2 layers Matrix Micro Coating.
Posted Image

#12 Dan

Dan

    Registered User

  • Members
  • 6,153 posts

Posted 18 January 2011 - 06:25 AM

Posted Image
Posted Image

OCW on unpolished paint that was about 3 years old at the time.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users